This page is dedicated to short stories or children's books, and a cartoon, which include Japanese dolls, though not as important characters. In most cases, clicking on the detail image will show the entire page from which it is taken, or several illustrations from the book.

For books about Japanese doll characters, see the Picture Books page.
For illustrations to Japanese fairy stories that include dolls, see the Japanese Fairy Tales page.
For illustrated poems, see the Poems page.
 

Golliwogg's Bicycle Club, text by Bertha Upton, pictures by Florence Upton (British, 1895) 

     In this book the Golliwog interrupts a boring summer by creating bicycles in which they all go adventuring: they manage to reach Japan for a brief but pleasant visit. 
     It's not clear what we are supposed to think about the little vignette of a Japanese doll lying on its back (on the text page opposite the Golly -as -jinriskisha man picture--click to see the entire page plus two more of Golly in Japan). Perhaps he has fainted at the sight of these dolls and their vigorous antics. Or perhaps the artist had acquired a doll to use as a model and wanted to include a sketch!

Thanks for the images of this book to the Baldwin Collection of the University of Florida Libraries, which is engaged in its own project to put historical children's literature online.

A Truly Story of My Dolls  (written/illus. Elizabeth S. Tucker) 
Boston, ca. 1890

The author created another picture book, A Cup of Tea, focussing on the adventures of Japanese boy dolls, but in this one "my Jap" is "queer ... an' sweet" as is often the case in children's stories.
Click on picture for scans of the entire booklet.

Madame Chrysanthemum (Pierre Loti)
1888, France
Rossi or Rossi & Myrbach

Two illustrations, listed from a French edition in 1888, scanned from an undated  American translation. Both are signed Rossi. The first is placed at the end of the chapter in which Loti announces he has married into a family of puppets, the secord at the end of the entire novel.

See The M.P.'s Daughter for another illustration signed "Rossi."

For more on Madame Chrysanthème, see the page on Japanese dolls in literature.

Pictures and Stories for the Play Room
cover
no date, no artist listed

This book is a typical collection of stories and verses, probably previously published in various children's magazines. None of the stories inside has to do with a Japanese doll. The covers however may have been specially done for the book--two paintings in which a Japanese doll goes from security to peril. Note that he wears shoes--the artist was drawing on memory, not a model, probably.
 

The Big Book For Tinies
cover
Mrs. Herbert Strang, author/editor

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Strang were a publishing dynamo, with many books for boys and girls, annuals and collections of stories. This particular book was so poorly made that the first story is missing. None of what remains relates to the doll on the cover.

Dollie Darlings
No author, illustrator or date listed;  ca. 1905

This is a story in which a collection of ethnic dolls come alive and take a little girl on a world tour. Togo, the Japanese doll, has a lively personality (click for text as well as full illustration)

The Live Dolls' House Party (Josephine Scribner Gates)
1906
illus. Virginia Keep

The Live Dolls books  by Josephine Gates, illustrated by Virginia Keep, were a popular series. None of the "live dolls" (belonging to little girls in a particular village)  was Japanese, but in this book the dolls and their owners visit  Japanese doll-land. 

Mamma Nelly and I / Adventures of a Happy Dolly 
1908 , American
illus. Grace Evans

This is a glimpse of an illustration which appears in different episodes of  two different books. Click on the picture for more!
 

La Poupée Japonaise (Félicien Champsaur)
1912, France
illus. Haru Kawa

This is a novel centering on a woman's life in the early years of Japan's contact with the West; the main character, the "Japanese doll," is a young woman who becomes a courtesan in order to replenish the family's fortune (a very French, although also very Japanese, plot). For more, see the Mirror of Women page.

There were two illustrators, but this vignette of a doll on the title page is by Haru Kawa.

My Toys: The Humpty Dumpty Toy Book
written and illustrated by Ethel Roskruge

This tiny book (only 3"square)  is the author/artist's account of her toy collection, including three Japanese dolls. Click on the image for several more pages.

 

My Dolly Book
1920s?
No evidence of illustrator or date.
M A. Donohue & Co, Chicago

This little book has only a few pages, pictures of dolls with rhyming captions. Someone has used the copy as a coloring book; also, it may have lost some pages. In its current condition, the only Japanese doll is the one on the cover (the back cover is the mirror image of the front), 

The cover, shown here, provides an example of the "multicultural doll family" including a Kewpie with wings (recalling its origins as Cupid), a soldier doll, a little girl doll, an American Indian, and some kind of jointed puppet, as well as the Japanese doll. The dolls inside are mostly blonde dolly types and a rag doll. 

Pansy Eyes: A Maid of Japan (Besse Toulouse Sprague)
 illus. Bess Devine Jewell , 1922

The doll in this story is home-made, though she guides her owner to the land of dolls, Japan.

MARY'S DOLL GARDEN  (Dinkie Dee)
Illus. Anne Geyer, 1924

In this little book, Mary's garden grows with what she wishes for--dolls, of course. The Japanese doll is the only "ethnic" doll in the group.

Scans courtesy of spookaroo ebay auctions.

Child's Garden of Verse (Robert Louis Stevenson)

full-page book illustration, Ruth Hallock

Image of girl taking tea with Japanese doll, illustrating Stevenson's verse "Foreign Children":

You have curious things to eat,
I am fed on proper meat;
You must dwell upon the foam,
But I am safe and live at home.
     Little Indian, Sioux or Crow,
     Little frosty Eskimo,
     Little Turk or Japanee,
Oh! don't you wish that you were me?

Silly Symphony: "Broken Toys"

Drawing for animation, 1935, US 
Walt Disney (artist team, perhaps Grim Natwick) 

Click for more information on this Disney cartoon featuring a Japanese doll.