Email all work for the course to me at richardburt33@gmail.com

Recommended Links

The Myth-of-American-Meritocracy

Lord Byron, "Darkness"

Bill Readings, The University in Ruins

Email all work for the course to me at richardburt33@gmail.com

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE (Please expect minor adjustments to be made in the schedule from time to time; all changes will be announced both in class and on the class email listserv; this webpage will also be updated)

August 22: "Alas, poor Yorick" Loose Ends: Posthumous Publication and the Spirit of Literature

Shakespeare's Grave, Sir Thomas Browne's Skull, Jacques Derrida's "Last Words"

The Corpus (published body of work and human corpse)

Here is your first assignment, due tomorrow, Wednesday, August 23 by 5 p.m..
Watch this film: The Trip to Italy (dir. Michael Winterbottom, 2014).
You can rent or buy it online. In a word doc or doxc, write two discussion questions

numbered one and two,

and three shots with three film analysis terms 

on The Trip to Italy (dir. Michael Winterbottom, 2014). Email your DQs and three shots in one word document (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. Don't forget to put your name in the documents at the top and in the document title when you save it. Do not send google docs, pdfs, or any other kind of document. Just word doc or doxc. Just one doc.

August 24: Mourning for Life

The Trip to Italy (dir. Michael Winterbottom, 2014)

Due AUGUST 28 by 5 p.m.: Two discussion questions, numbered one and two, and three big words on Jacques Derrida, "Last Words" AND Two discussion questions, numbered one and two, and three big words on Peter Sznedy's "Exit: JD's Dream" due by 5 p.m. SUNDAY, AUGUST 28. Email your DQs in one word document (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. Don't forget to put your name in the document AT THE TOP and in the document heading. Send as a word doc or doxc attachment. Do do not send pdfs, goodgle docs, and so on.

August 29:

Required Reading:

1. Jacques Derrida, "Last Words"

2. Peter Szendy, "Exit: JD's Dream," or “Sortie: Le rêve de J.D.Sur Écoute: Esthétique de l’espionnage. Paris: Les Éditions de Minuit, 2007. 145-53. English translation here and here.

Recommended Reading:

Jorge Luis Borges, "The Garden of Forking Paths"

Orpheo ed Euridice

Jacques Derrida, "Fichus"

Maurice Blanchot, “Friendship”

David Hume, My Own Life

Giving Up the Ghost: Michel de Montaigne, "Letter to His Father: On the Death of Étienne de la Boétie

Due by AUGUST 30, 5 p.m.: Two discussion questions, numbered one and two, and three big words on Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman Book 1, due by 5 p.m. Wednesday, AUGUST 30. Email your DQs in one word document (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. Don't forget to put your name in the document AT THE TOP and in the document heading. Send as a word doc or doxc attachment. Do do not send pdfs, goodgle docs, and so on.

August 31:

Required Reading:

Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman Book 1

http://www.gasl.org/refbib/Sterne__Shandy_Journey.pdf

Recommended Looking and Listening:

Helen Williams, "'Alas, Poor YORICK!': Sterne's Iconography of Mourning"

"Tristram Shandy: The Art of Black Mourning Pages"

Closely Reading and Close Looking

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Laurence Sterne's novel Tristram Shandy

September 4: Due by September 4, 5 p.m: Two discussion questions, numbered one and two, and three big words on Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy Book 2 due . Email your DQs in one word document (as an attachment) to me atrichardburt33@gmail.com. Don't forget to put your name in the document at the top and in the document heading. I will no longer post notices of dues dates for DQs and big words as I figure you should understand the practice by now. DQs and BIG WORDS or Three Shots are always due the day before class by 5 p.m. Send all work as a word doc or doxc attachment. Do do not send pdfs, google docs, and so on. Just one doc.

September 5:

Required Reading:

Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy Book 2

Recommended Reading:

Marbled pages

Zounds!

Sterne's letters, Yorick's(?) Sermon, Sterne's last will

Jacques Derrida and Catherine Malabou, two tables of contents to Counterpath

September 7:

Required Reading:

Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, Book 3

Recommended Reading:

GYORGY Lukacs, "Richness, Chaos, and Form: A Dialogue Concerning Laurence Sterne," in SOUL & FORM

Paul de Man, "The Concept of Irony"

2A. Lewis P. Curtis, "Forged Letters of Laurence Sterne," PMLA, Vol. 50, No. 4 (Dec., 1935), pp. 1076-1106

2A. George Haggerty, “'Alas, Poor Yorick!': Elegiac Friendship in Tristram Shandy." PMLA

3A. Yoklavich, John M. 
 “Notes on the Early Editions of Tristram Shandy.” PMLA, Vol. 63, No. 2 (Jun.), 1948, 508-519.

September 12

1. Required Viewing: Hamlet (dir. Laurence Olivier, 1948)

2. Bridget Gellert, "The Iconography of Melancholy in the Graveyard Scene of Hamlet" Studies in Philology, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 1970), pp. 57-66.

September 14:

Required Readings:

1. Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, Books 4 and 5

September 19:

Required Readings:

1. Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, Book 6

Recommended Readings:

0. Helen Williams, “Alas, poor YORICK!”: Sterne’s Iconography of Mourning

1. Yorick's Afterlives

2. Kenneth Monkman, "Sterne, Hamlet, and Yorick"

3. Blackwood's magazine,- "Bozzy and Yorick."

September 21:

Required Reading: 

1. Tristram Shandy, Book 7

2.  Jacques Derrida,  “My Chances / Mes Chances: A Rendezvous with Some Epicurean Stereophonies,” in Taking Chances: Derrida, Psychoanalysis, and Literature, eds. Joseph H.

Recommended:

Reading by Chance: Sortes Vergilianae

Recommended Viewing: A Cock and Bull Story (dir. Michael Winterbottom, 2005)

September 26:

Required Reading:

1. Tristram Shandy, Book 8

2. Viktor Shkolvsky, “The Novel as Parody:  Sterne’s Tristram Shandy” in Theory of Prose, 1991 Dalkey Archive Press, pp. 147-70.

During class: The Widow Wadman

September 28:

Required Reading:

1. Tristram Shandy, Book 9 

2.  Georg Lukacs, "Richness, Chaos, and Form: A Dialogue on Laurence Sterne," (1909) in Soul and Form, pp. 144-74.

DUE OCTOBER 1: First Paper (500 words) DUE Sunday October 1 by 11:59 p.m. TOPICS TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text or is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out your title after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :) Volume VI, chapter XXXIX; Volume IX, Dedication; Volume I, chapter VIII; Volume III, chapters XXV and XXVI; Volume I, chapters XII and XIII; Volume III, the Author's Preface," between chapters XXXVI and XXXVI; Volume IV, chapter XXVIII; Volume I, chapters V and VI; Volume VI, chapters XL and XXXIX; Volume IV, chapter XXIV; Volume IX, chapter XXV and chapter IV; Volume IX, chapters XVIII and XIX  and "The Eighteenth Chapter " and "The Nineteenth Chapter"; Volume III, chapter II; Volume VI, chapter XXXVIII; Volume V, chapter I; Volume VIII, chapter XIX

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, your grade is an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

Live GRADING

October 3: Sooner or Later

Required Reading:

Paul de Man, “Excuses (Confessions),” Chapter 12 of Allegories of Reading, pp. 278-30.

Recommended:

Relevant selections from Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Confessions

J. L. Austin, "A Plea for Excuses" or here.

John Mullan, "Fault Finding in Johnson’s Lives of the Poets"

Recommended Reading:

Werner Hermacher, "Lectio: de Man's Imperative," in Premises, pp. 181-221


October 5:

Required Reading:

Jacques Derrida, "Typewriter Ribbon, Ink (2): (within such limits)," pp. 128-60.

October 10: Required Reading:

Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey, Volume One.

Recommended Readings:

Travels through France and Italy

October 12: Required Reading:

1. Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey, Volume Two.

2. Mary‐Céline Newbould, "Character or Caricature? Depicting Sentimentalism
and Richard Newton's illustrations of Laurence Sterne's A Sentimental Journey"

October 17: Sterne's death, skulls, and reburials

Required Reading:

1. John Keats’ “On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Again” (see images below)

2. Randall McLeod, "Un-Editing Shakespeare," Sub-stance Vol. 10/11, Vol. 10, no. 4 - Vol. 11, no. 1, Issue 33-34: (1981/1982), pp. 26-55

 

Recommended Readings:

John Milton, "On Shakespeare"

Gordon Campbell, "Shakespeare and the Youth of Milton."

Mary Shelley's two posthumous editions of Percy Bysse Shelley's works.

October 19:

Required Reading: W.G. Day's posthumously edited and co-authored article Kenneth Monkman's "The Skull," in The Shandean (1998).

Required Viewing:

Sterne's deaths, skull, and reburials

Recommended Reading:

Obituary on Kenneth Monkman (Introduction, table contents, and pp. 1-20) by W.G. Day

and

A Warwickshire Man, How Shakespeare 's Skull Was Stolen

"Shakespeare's Bones"

Shakespeare's monument (posterity)

Shakespeare's Last Will and Testament

Old Hamlet in Lord Byron's Don Juan, Canto XIII

October 24:

Required Reading:

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Reveries of the Solitary Walker, Second and Fourth Promenades

John Keats' Epitaph

October 26:

Required Reading:

Sir Thomas Browne, Religio Medici and Urne-Buriall (New York Review Books Classics)

October 31:

Required Reading:

Sir Thomas Browne, Religio Medici and Urne-Buriall (New York Review Books Classics)

Recommended Reading:

Thomas Sebald, The Rings of Saturn (1995)

November 2:

Required Reading:

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Coleridge's Ancient Mariners: Texts and Revisions 1798-1828 edited with commentary by Martin Wallen. Barrytown, NY: Station Hill Press, 1993.

Recommended Reading:

Lawrence Lipking, "The Marginal Gloss"

November 7:

Required Reading:

1. Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Coleridge's Ancient Mariners: Texts and Revisions 1798-1828 edited with commentary by Martin Wallen. Barrytown, NY: Station Hill Press, 1993.

2. Anne Williams, "An I for an Eye: 'Spectral Persecution' in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" PMLA, Vol. 108, No. 5. (Oct., 1993), pp. 1114-1127.

November 9:

Required Viewing:

The Trip (dir. Michael Winterbottom, 2002)

Recommended Reading:

"The Trip as Mourning Comedy"


Percy Shelley, "Ye Hasten to the Grave"

November 14:

Required Reading:

1. William Wordsworth, Essays Upon Epitaphs (1810), pp. 642 and ff.

2. Paul De Man, "Autobiography as Defacement" 

November 16: Fakespeare? Editing as Reconstruction

Required Reading:

William Shakespeare, Double Falsehood aka Cardenio

The play is based on a story in the story of Miguel de Cervantes' novel Don Quixote.

Recommended "Fake" Shakespeare:

Fiona RitchiePeter Sabor, ed. Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century 2012

Kate Rumbold, Shakespeare and the Eighteenth-Century NovelCultures of Quotation from Samuel Richardson to Jane Austen

William Shakespeare, Pericles (Arden Third edition) and Oxford World's Classics edition

November 21:

Required Reading:

1. William Shakespeare, Double Falsehood aka Cardenio

Recommended Reading:

"Fake Shakespeare play Double Falsehood 'is genuine' after all"

Miguel de Cervantes' skull

November 23:

Thanksgiving

Second Paper (500 words) DUE Sunday November 26 by 11:59 p.m. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text or is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out your title after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :)

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, your grade is an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

SPEED GRADING

November 28: Skeleton Crew Editions

Required Reading:

Shakespeare's Timon of Athens.  You may read either the Oxford edition or the Arden Third Series edition.  Here are links to both editions.

https://www.amazon.com/Timon-Athens-Third-Arden-Shakespeare/dp/1903436974/


https://www.amazon.com/Timon-Athens-Oxford-Shakespeare-Classics/dp/0199537445

November 30:

Required Reading:

Shakespeare's Timon of Athens.  You may read either the Oxford edition or the Arden Third Series edition.  Here are links to both editions.

https://www.amazon.com/Timon-Athens-Third-Arden-Shakespeare/dp/1903436974/


https://www.amazon.com/Timon-Athens-Oxford-Shakespeare-Classics/dp/0199537445

 

Recommended:

December 5:

Required Reading:

JOHN MILTON, Lycidas

Recommended Viewing or Reading:

TBA

Third Paper (50 words) due before class, December 8. Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com.

The Late Mr. ——— &c., &c.; continued by Madame L***** with the generous assistance of Madame K*****,

"DIE-JESTING stURNe’s BURIALLs: Publication, Plagiarism, Pseudonymity, Pseudography, Cenography, Palimpsestuosity, Posthumography, and the Propriety or Pathos of Posterity,"

in Shakespeare in an Era of Textual Exhaustion (2018), 199-243.

"The afterlife of Laurence Sterne
(1713–1768): Body snatching,
dissection and the role of Cambridge
anatomist Charles Collignon"
Jenna M Dittmar and Piers D Mitchell

http://www.tristramshandyweb.it/sezioni/langrhet/langrhet_themes/multivoice/mv_indice.htm

https://www.schillerinstitute.org/fid_97-01/004_rabelaisian.html

http://www.ricorso.net/rx/az-data/authors/s/Sterne_L/life.htm

Plot Summaries:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Life_and_Opinions_of_Tristram_Shandy,_Gentleman#Synopsis_and_style

https://www.enotes.com/topics/tristram-shandy

https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/t/tristram-shandy/book-summary

Table of Contents:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1079/1079-h/1079-h.htm

Descriptive Tables of Contents for each volume of Tristram Shandy

A Table of Contents for Tristram Shandy
by Charles Parish

“College English”, XXII, 3, 1960, pp. 143-50

 

https://archive.org/details/lifeopinionsoftr00steruoft

 

http://www.tristramshandyweb.it/sezioni/TS/parish.htm

 

https://www1.gifu-u.ac.jp/~masaru/TS/contents.html

 

 

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/VeryEndWorldWeber.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/Stanleyfishdemocritusjunior.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/Boothsternecompleteshandy.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/PicturesofPronunciation.pdf

 

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/anarchives.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/NosesHelenMoglen.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/SterneRabelaisianFragment.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/PuncutationMarks.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/Bibliomania!/firstpapertopics.html

 

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/sterneshakespeareshelley/rabelaissortesfrozenwords.pdf

http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/sterneshakespeareshelley/SermonTristramShandy.pdf



http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/sterneshakespeareshelley/BorrowingOthersWords.pdf



http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/sterneshakespeareshelley/ComicSublimeSterneFiction.pdf



http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/sterneshakespeareshelley/TheSermonInterpolation.pdf​

 

Opening and the end of All the President's Men --sound of type on paper versus sound of teletype

Sounds handwriting or typing or writing on a computer in film.
Not just writing of sounds, but the sound of writing

Music reading

deaf son in There Will Be Blood

Wagner, Deafness, and the Reception of Beethoven's Late Style

As the Baton Rouge Advocate reported, a demonstration in a residential neighborhood of the city on Sunday only got more heated when about 300 marchers were blocked by officers wearing gas masks and driving an armored vehicle with an ear-splitting sound cannon called an LRAD, or long-range acoustic device.
https://theintercept.com/2016/07/11/images-militarized-police-baton-rouge-draw-global-attention/​

The Sixth Sense

Derek Jarman’s last film, Blue

made while Jarman had gone blind while dying of AIDs, Bill Morrison's Decasia,

Derrida’s Memoirs of the Blind,

Chion's Sound Cinema;

GERT HOFMANN, The Film Explainer (trans. Michael Hoffman);

Usai's Silent Film: An Introduction,

Clark’s Sight of Death.

Diderot Letter on the Blind

Ridicule.  End of the documentary

Back To Normandy by Nicholas Philibert

watch-a-blind-man-experience-his-own-portrait-for-the-first-time.html

Cries and Whispers

 Hans Beltung on Saint Veronica; Barbet, Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ

Sheldon Pollock, "Future Philology? The Fate of a Soft Science in a Hard World"

"How DNA Changed the World of Forensics" NY Times, May 18, 2014

Carlo Ginzburg, “Clues: Morelli, Freud, and Sherlock Holmes,” in History Workshop, No. 9 (Spring, 1980), pp. 5-36.

Paolo Cherchi Usai, David Alexander Horwath, Michael Loebenstein, ed. Film Curatorship: Museums, Curatorship and the Moving Image (chapter three, pp.107-29)

"How DNA Changed the World of Forensics" NY Times, May 18, 2014

Optional Reading: D.A. Greetham, "Textual Forensics"; Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "A Case of Identity" (1899) and "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box" (1893); Sigmund Freud, "The Moses of Michelangelo" (1914) Standard Edition, 13: 209-238. Digital "Exploded Manuscript" of Freud's essay.

Optional Reading: D.A. Greetham, "Textual Forensics"; Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "A Case of Identity" (1899) and "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box" (1893); Sigmund Freud, "The Moses of Michelangelo" (1914) Standard Edition, 13: 209-238. Digital "Exploded Manuscript" of Freud's essay.

DAVID GRANN, "The Mark of a Masterpiece: The man who keeps finding famous fingerprints on uncelebrated works of art" New Yorker July 12, 2010

Painter charged with making fake Jackson Pollock paintings (July 2014)

Wine Forgery

Paolo Cherchi Usai, "Preserving Film Outside the Vaults: A Report on Projection, Shipping and Temporary Storage Facilities"

What is Philology?

Sheldon Pollock, "Future Philology? The Fate of a Soft Science in a Hard World"

Jean Bollack and Priscilla H. Barnum, "Texts and Their Interpreters: The Enterprise of Philology," SubStance, Vol. 22, No. 2/3, Issue 71/72: Special Issue: Epistémocritique (1993), pp. 315-320.

Seth Lerer and Joseph A. Dane, "What is a Text?," Huntington Library Quarterly vol. 58 no. 1 (1995), 1-10.

t Do We Expect from a Verdict?

All the President's Men (dir. Alan J. Pakula, 1976) (opening and ending of typewriter and teletype; shredder scenes; notecards on floor scene)

Mr. Holmes trailer

True Story trailer (the fetishism of just records)

Optional:

Psychoanalysis, Deconstruction, and the Law:

Sigmund Freud on the double and on legal insanity / Sigmund Freud, "The Uncanny"

Optional:

Jacques Derrida, The Death Penalty Vol. 1

Gavel to Gavel Coverage

The Kafka Project

Kafka's Wound

(We will read this essay later in the semester.)

 

Selections from James Turner, Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Humanities

Touch of Evil (posthumously restored in 1998, according to Welles' memo to Universal Studios)

Performance (dir. Nicolas Roeg, 1971)

Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Ethan Brand"

Mess and Research

Scribs and Scribbles

Paul Feyerabend, Against Method

Heimito von Doderer, The Demons

Friedrich Theodor Vischer, "A Rabid Philosopher"

Thomas Bernhard, The Loser

Carlo Ginzburg, Clues

Friedrich Schlegel, "On Incomprehensibility"

"The Last Trial"

The Hunt (dir. Thomas Vinterberg, 2013)

The Male Animal (1942)

Optional: A Scanner Darkly (dir. Richard Linklater, 2006)

Missing (dir. Costas Gravas, 1982)

Before the Law and the Scene of the Crime: Orson Welles, The Trial (1962)

Philip K. Dick, A Scanner Darkly

Detour vs. No Country for Old Men

Getting Away with It?

and The Most Dangerous Game

The Oxbow Incident

The Lady Eve (dir. Preston Sturges)

Into the Abyss (dir. Werner Herzog, 2006)

If you want to learn more about what Charles E. Robinson did and why he did it.

http://shelleygodwinarchive.org/contents/frankenstein/the-frankenstein-notebooks-introduction/

You might want to compare Wolfson and Levao's timeline to Robinson's:

http://shelleygodwinarchive.org/contents/frankenstein/frankenstein-chronology/