Email all work to me at richardburt33@gmail.com.

Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations

Ludovico Einaudi, "Experience"

The Wizard of Oz "Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain."

(Watch films on disc or streaming: UF KANOPY is free)

RESEMBLANCE AND ITS LIMITS

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE (Please expect minor adjustments to be made in the schedule from time to time; all changes will be announced both in class and on the class email listserv; this webpage will also be updated.)

Email all work to me at richardburt33@gmail.com Discussion Questions are always due by 5:00 p.m. the day before we meet for class.

January 9: Repetitions (Play, Loops, and Circles) and RESEMBLANCES

Silent Film Soundtracks and Other Resources

The Chromatics' music video, "Shadow (I took your picture from the frame)"

The Chromatics' Cherry album version of "Shadow (Take Me Down)"

Due January 10 by 5 p.m.: Two discussion questions numbered one and two, on Koyaanisqatsi (dir.  Godfrey Reggio, 1982). numbered one and two, and describe any three shots with three film analysis terms. Put your name at the top of the document. Email all work to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. I will no longer post this notice on the schedule below since you should understand the assignment, unless otherwise specified by me, and the due dates (Mondays and Wednesdays by 5 p.m.) by now. Please send me only a word doc or a word docx. Do not send me anything on google drive, etc. Thanks.

January 11

Koyaanisqatsi (dir.  Godfrey Reggio, 1982)

This is a modern silent film without intertitles: there is no dialogue, only a continuously playing Philip Glass synth-symphonic score that frequently loops sequences that serve as Leitmotifs.

Sound loops versus Leitmotifs as motivation for the image.

Recommended Viewing:

Jenny Holzer Billboard Art

Thanksgiving traffic: Los Angeles ABC7 Los Angeles 11/21/2017

Apple tv animated aerial screensavers

Drone (frame rates of different speeds) versus helicopter shot (16-24 frames per second)

Celluloid projection vs. digital projection

Due January 15 by 5 p.m.: Two discussion questions numbered one and two, and describe any three shots with three film analysis terms  http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/threefilmshots.html, numbered 1-3, on Koyaanisqatsi (dir. Godfrey Reggio, 1982) Man with Movie Camera (dir. Dziga Vertov) with Michael Nyman soundtrack. Put your name at the top of the document. Email all work to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. I will no longer post this notice on the schedule below since you should understand the assignment, unless otherwise specified by me, and the due dates (Mondays and Wednesdays by 5 p.m.) by now

January 16

Required Reading and Viewing (You may write one discussion question on the reading and one on the film and 3 shots on the film and three BIG Words):

1. Lev Manovich, The Language of New Media, "Prologue: Vertov's Dataset," pp. xiv-xxxviii; and "Database Cinema: Greenaway and Vertov," pp. 237-243.

2. Watch this version, linked below:

Man with Movie Camera (dir. Dziga Vertov) with Michael Nyman soundtrack (on youtube for free)

Recommended alternative soundtrack:

Flicker Alley's

Man with a Movie Camera (on UF Kanopy)

From John Wick Chapter 2 (dir. Chad Stahelski, 2017)

January 18

Required Viewing:

Decasia (dir. Bill Morrison, 2002) (Decasia is also a modern silent film.)

 

Gif from Decasia as silent film

Recommended Viewing:

January 23

Required Reading:

Peter Szendy, Listen: A History of Our Ears, Chapter Four

January 25

Required Reading: Haruki Murakami and‎ Seiji Ozawa,‎ Absolutely on Music: Conversations (2016), pp. tba

"For Murakami, there are no fundamental differences between a writing style and a musical one." Murakami: “You can’t write well if you don’t have an ear for music."

Quiz in class on Basic Terms of Music (scale, melody, harmony, time signature, rythm, downbeat, fugue, and so on) and Film Analysis

Recommended Reading:

Colin Marshall, "Music Meets Writing: On Haruki Murakami and Seiji Ozawa."

W.K. Wimsatt, The Verbal Icon: Studies in the Meaning of Poetry (1954) "When Is Variation Elegant?" 

Paolo Cherchi Usai, selections from The Death of CinemaHistory, Cultural Memory, and the Digital Dark Age

First Paper Due Saturday January 27 by 11:59 p.m.

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com). Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Live GRADING I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, your grade is an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

January 30

Required Reading:

Pascal Quignard,‎ Matthew Amos The Hatred of Music (The Margellos World Republic of Letters) 2016, pp. tba

Recommended Reading and Listening:

Dionysus, Sirens, Dance Music in the Tank

Said Energizer, "24 Hours of Night"

Apollonian and Dionysian

BRANDEN W. JOSEPH, "Biomusic," Grey Room, No. 45, On Brainwashing: Mind Control, Media, and Warfare (Fall 2011), pp. 128-150.

Peter Szendy, "Music as Torture"

February 2

Required Viewing: (Another silent sound film)

The Naked Island (dir. Kaneto Shindo, 1960)

February 13

Required Reading:

Peter Szendy, Hits: Philosophy in the Jukebox, pp. 1-30.

Required Viewing:

Baby Driver (dir. Edgar Wright, 2017)

Opening Sequence of Drive (dir. Nicolas Refn, 2011)

February 15 Film Restoration

Required Viewing:

The Devil's Needle  (dir. Chester Withey, 1916)

February 20

Required Viewing:

Like Someone to Love (dir. Abbas Kiarostami, 2012)

February 22

Required Viewing:

Like Someone to Love (dir. Abbas Kiarostami, 2012) (Watch it a second time.)

February 27

Required Listening:

Franz Schubert, Die Schöne Müllerin Ian Bostridge Mitsuko Uchida

More, if you wish to know more:

Franz Schubert,  

Die schöne Müllerin (Op. 25, D. 795)

Required Reading:

Ian BostridgeSchubert's Winter Journey: Anatomy of an Obsession 

March 1 to March 11

SPRING BREAK

March 13

Required Viewing:

The Piano (dir. Jane Campion, 1992) soundtrack by Michael Nyman

March 15

Required Viewing:

A Ghost Story (dir. David Lowery, 2017)

March 20

Required Viewing:

A Cottage on Dartmoor (dir. Anthony Asquith, 1929)

March 22

Required Reading: Required Viewing:

Paolo Cherchi Uschai, Silent Cinema: An Introduction Chapter Three on "The Ethics of Film Preservation," pp. 44-76

Shooting Stars (dir. Anthony Asquith, 1928)

March 27

Required Viewing:

Carl Dreyer, Passion of Joan of Arc, Masters of Cinema blu-ray and Criterion Blu-Ray editions and clip in Godard's Vivre sa Vie when Nana and her john go to see Dreyer's Passion of Joan of Arc.

Stills from the Criterion and MofC DVDs

Second Paper (500 words) DUE Saturday March 29 by 11:59 p.m. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text or is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out your title after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :) Also, please insert image captures as needed.

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardburt33@gmail.com).. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, your grade is an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

Live GRADING

March 29

Required Reading:

Blackmail (dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1929)

April 3

Required Reading: Required Viewing:

Alfred Hitchcock, The Lodger: A Story of the London Fo1927 (BFI blu-ray, new orchestral soundtrack composed by Nitin Sawhney) 2012, Region B versus MGM DVD soundtrack (menu options for two orchestral soundtracks), National Film and Television Archive source print)

2008, Region 1 versus  DVD soundtrack [no sound at all], BFI source print, 2008), Region 2

 

The Lodger (dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) and Downhill (1927). 

Recommended:

The Phantom Fiend (1932) sound remake of The Lodger, also starring Ivor Novello

Michel Chion,"The Screaming Point," in Audiovision.

Richard Wagner, Parsifal (1880)Kundry's scream (twice) in Act II, screaming again and becoming mute in Act III.

Silent Scream Queens: Scream versus Laughter 

Notes on The Lodger as deaf cinema

April 5

Required Viewing:

Blow Out (dir. Brian de Palma,1981)

April 10

Required Viewing: David Lean's Blithe Spirit (1945)

Required Reading: Michel Chion, Film, A Sound Art, Chapter 26 

Recommended: pdf here of Michel Chion's chapter, "Phantom Audio-Vision" from AudioVision (partly on The Invisible Man)

April 12

 

Required Reading:

Paolo Cherchi Usai, The Death of Cinema: History, Cultural Memory, and the Digital Dark Age

Paolo Usai's film, Passio / Usai burns the negative

 

 

Required Viewing:

Mahler (dir. Ken Russell, 1974)

April 17

 

Required Viewing:

The Artist (dir. Michel Hazanavicius, 2011)

 

April 19

Required Reading:

Recommended: pdf here of Michel Chion's chapter, "Phantom Audio-Vision" from AudioVision (partly on The Invisible Man)

April 24

Required Reading: Paolo Cherchi Usai, David Alexander Horwath, Michael Loebenstein, ed. Film Curatorship: Museums, Curatorship and the Moving Image (pp. 8-27 and chapter three, pp.107-29)

Recommended: Entuziazm (Simfonija Donbassa) (2 DVDs) Dziga Vertov (restored and unrestored versions)

Early Tape Loop Experiments With Eno, Fripp, Terry Riley, And Pauline Oliveros

Final Paper (500 words) due April 23 by 5:00 p.m. (please email it to me at richardburt33@gmail.com).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'll have to teach the class twice if I can what I did here exactly. I'll make a movie of what I do each class this semester. And then next semester the transcription and descriptions of what I've done will have to transcribed and that will be my screenplay. But since you are new, I'll have to say whatever I'm saying now again only to different students who will therefore not know how to respond to me since there will be silences when one is speaking. Or I could play the recording for you each class. Would it be the same class?

 

From there to we will move back to Francis Ford Coppola’s reintroduction of silent cinema techniques in Bram Stoker's Dracula (1993) just as celluloid cinema came to the beginning of the end.  We will move further back in time to Alfred Hitchcock’s silent and sound versions of,The Artist, Abbas Kiorastami’s Like Someone to Love (2013); an among others.  Readings will include Michel Chion’s "When Film Was Deaf," in Film, a Sound Art, pp. 3-17; Words on Screen; and Film: A Sound Art; Hanns Eisler and Theodor Adorno’s Composing for the Films; John Cage on silence; and Peter Szendy, Listen A History of Ours; Espionage; and Stigmatology, among others

 

Koyaanisqatsi moments of silence in the film--overhead shot, no sound of freeways after accelerated night traffic. Then should picks up as camera gets higher. Also shots of TV images. Shot of TVs blowing up, like the opening of Brazil (dir. Terry Gilliam, 1985). Many dissolves as patterns become more end more abstract, different colors--like like computer mother boards. Tron. The grid! Other place of silence after all the bombs, napalms explode. Also, ending with Space shuttle disaster--Challenger--dissolve to final shot--end titles--loop of noise--of male newscaster. Women come in. Like a party line loop. "celebrating its" enter --you can hear some of it. Hopi saying at the end. Film already New Age. IBM--sounds like voice of news anchor John Chancellor on NBC.