Email all work to me at  richardaburt22@gmail.com.

Due tomorrow August 25 by 5 p.m. Two discussion questions numbered one and two, with your name at the top of the document, the each of the two required readings linked above. Just Your Name. Nothing else. Nothing. Else. Email your DQs in one word document with last name as the document title to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com

It is essential that you understand what I mean by discussion question. If you send me questions that are merely perfunctory or are not what I consider to be genuine discussion questions, I will not post them or accept them. If you don't see yours posted in the emails I send you each monday and Wednesday, you can also ask me why I didn't during office hours or by appointment. I do really want to help you learn. And I am quite patient. We can communicate through it. My office is in 4134 Turlington.

All films that are linked below, will direct you to UF Kanopy where you may see them for free. All film titles that are not linked below, you will have to find and see our your own. All linked readings will take you to a pdf. All readings that are not linked you will have to find on your own.

Since I know many students read online rather than in print, I will make sure we can always get to the page or to the shot we are discussing by having someone, either me or a student, standing near the computer at the front of the class so we can get there. I do not allow any electronic device such as iphones or ipads or laptops, etc. to be open during class. Everyone needs to be in class 100 percent. Learning is not something you can do well if you multi-task.

"Historical, in fact philological, considerations have slowly but surely taken the place of profound explorations of eternal problems. The question becomes: What did this or that philosopher think or not think? And is this or that text rightly ascribed to him or not? And even: Is this variant of a classical text preferable to that other? Students in university seminars today are encouraged to occupy themselves with such emasculated inquiries. As a result, of course, philosophy itself is banished from the university altogether." 

Friedrich Nietzsche, Anti-Education

"HOW TO LOSE FRIENDS AND INFURIATE PEOPLE"

--Kenneth Kidd (in conversation with me)

August 24:

Two Required Readings:

Reading One:

Walter Benjamin, "Books by the Mentally Ill: From My Collection," Selected Writings 2 (1)

Reading Two:

Ludwig Wittgenstein, The Blue and Brown Books (Preliminary Studies for the Philosophical Investigations), pp. 44-45

Due tomorrow August 25 by 5 p.m. Two discussion questions numbered one and two, with your name at the top of the document, the each of the two required readings linked above. Just Your Name. Nothing else. Nothing. Else. Email your DQs in one word document with last name as the document title to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com

All films that are linked below, will direct you to UF Kanopy where you may see them for free. All film titles that are not linked below, you will have to find and see our your own. All linked readings will take you to a pdf. All readings that are not linked you will have to find on your own.

Since I know many students read online rather than in print, I will make sure we can always get to the page or to the shot we are discussing by having someone, either me or a student, standing near the computer at the front of the class so we can get there. I do not allow any electronic device such as iphones or ipads or laptops, etc. to be open during class. Everyone needs to be in class 100 percent. Learning is not something you can multi-task.

I am usually in the classroom by 8:00. I will play music on the computer, sometimes a movie clip, sometimes a book, and talk about them to students who happen to be there. You are welcome to ignore me until class begins at 8:30. :)

"Historical, in fact philological, considerations have slowly but surely taken the place of profound explorations of eternal problems. The question becomes: What did this or that philosopher think or not think? And is this or that text rightly ascribed to him or not? And even: Is this variant of a classical text preferable to that other? Students in university seminars today are encouraged to occupy themselves with such emasculated inquiries. As a result, of course, philosophy itself is banished from the university altogether." 

Fredriech Nietsche, Anti-Education

Firsts!

News on the March (formerly known as "Outburts")

Poor Richard’s Almanac:

BURT’S Prognostications, Prophecies, and Predictions

Ten minutes of birdsong from the English countryside

It may take you two to three weeks to get the hang of how this course works if you decide to take. I will asking you to write and think and read in ways no other teacher has. I don't want you to be confused, hwoever, and merely default to doing what you already know to do. The point of taking this class is to learn some things you don't already know how to do. If you have any questions, please do ask them. I should add that my course websites are kind of like art installations you'll be walking through.

All beginnings are dangerous.--The poet has the choice of either raising feeling from one step to the next and thus eventually increasing it to a very high level--or else attempting a sudden onslaught and pulling the bell-rope with all his might from the beginning: both have their dangers: in the first case, that his audience may flee out of boredom, in the second, out of fear.

--Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human II, "Mixed Opinions and and Maxims," section 163, ed. Gary Handwerk (Stanford UP, 2013), 67.

Please read the Class Policies now.

You will need to watch all assigned films on your own. You may rent, borrow, or purchase them (as downloads or discs).

Recommended Readings

Email all work for the course to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com

It is essential that you understand what I mean by discussion question. If you send me questions that are merely perfunctory or are not what I consider to be genuine discussion questions, I will not post them or accept them. If you don't see yours posted in the emails I send you each monday and Wednesday, you can also ask me why I didn't during office hours or by appointment. I do really want to help you learn. And I am quite patient. We can communicate through it. My office is in 4134 Turlington.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE (Please expect minor adjustments to be made in the schedule from time to time; all changes will be announced both in class and on the class email listserv; this webpage will also be updated)The Loser vs. the flaneur, the dandy, the buffoon, the jester, the fool, the madman, the defectieve, the alcholic or addict, the con man, the malcontent, the wanderer, Poe's "Man of the Crowd."

Here is your first assignment, due tomorrow, August 23 by 5 p.m. richardaburt22@gmail.com

Create a word document with your last name as the title of your document. Write two discussion questions, numbered one and two, and three BIG WORDS on Reading and Reading Two. Put your name at the bottom of the word document. Just Your Name. Nothing else. Nothing. Else. Email your word document (as an attachment) . It is essential that you understand what I mean by discussion question. If you send me work that is merely perfunctory or is not what I consider to be a discussion question, I will not post it or accept it. Email me your attached word document to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com by 5 p.m. tomorrow, August 23.

August 22: From "I Get That" to "I Don't Get That": "Moral Studies"

A Provocation: Why Hate Speech and Hatred Can Be Good Things in the Public Sphere

Moral Studies: Let's Take Detour Examine the Elitist Neoliberal Discourse of Civility

and Trickle Down Feminism

Motivational or Inspirational Speakers Dive into the heart of the Roland-Garros atmosphere! Chapter 3: motivation.

Samuel Beckett, From an Abandoned Work

"Self-Help" The TLS

Self-Help (or Self-Harm?) vs. Shelf-Help and Shelf Love

Samuel Smiles

bl.uk/collection

Religion; divination; Sortes Vergilianae; Carl Jung: Tarot Cards Provide Doorways to the Unconscious, and Maybe a Way to Predict the Future; Cartomancie;Tarocchi Cards of Mantegna at NYPL; Jacques Derrida, “My Chances / Mes Chances: A Rendezvous with Some Epicurean Stereophonies”

Walter Benjamin

"A sense of embarrassment often goes unnoticed as the source of a successful enterprise.

When I began, ten years ago, to create a more satisfactory order among my books, I soon came across volumes that I could not bring myself to get rid of but that I could no longer bear to leave where they were.

In this way, a motley collection came together over the years, a 'Library of Pathology,' long before I thought to actively build a collection of writings by the mentally ill--indeed, long before I even knew that books by the mentally ill existed. 

--Walter Benjamin, "Books by the Metally Ill: From My Collection" Selected Writings 2 (1),123-24.

August 24:

Two Required Readings:

Reading One:

Walter Benjamin, "Books by the Mentally Ill: From My Collection," Selected Writings 2 (1)

Reading Two:

Ludwig Wittgenstein, The Blue and Brown Books (Preliminary Studies for the Philosophical Investigations), pp. 44-45

Due tomorrow August 25 by 5 p.m. Two discussion questions numbered one and two, with your name at the top of the document, on Thomas Bernhard's The Loser, pp. 3-65. Just Your Name. Nothing else. Nothing. Else. Email your DQs in one word document with last name as the document title to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com.

Recommended (FYI):

Thomas Frank on "positive thinking" in Inequality and Populism: The Vicious Circle

Jacob Mikanowski,  "Haters"

Walter Benjamin, "The Destructive Character"

What Happens If You Don't Lose?

Walter Benjamin, "Unpacking My Library"

Walter Benjamin, "The Path to Success"

Arthur Schopenhauer, "On Reading and Books"

Arthur Schopenhauer, "Thinking for Oneself"

Friedrich Theodor Vischer, "A Rabid Philosopher"

Doris Duke (USA, 1969) "I'm a Loser"

Ke$ha - TiK ToK

Hidden Figures (2016)

20 Feet from Stardom (dir. Morgan Neville, 2013)

Merry Clayton in Gimme Shelter

And always in the name of the salvation of the trace, here of the manuscript to be saved, at the instant of death, during the Second World War, the following, which Michel Lisse has also brought to my attention:  “Whatever happens, the manuscript must be saved. It is more important than my own person.” (Walter Benjamin to Lisa Fittko, cited by Bernard Witte, Walter Benjamin: Une Biographe, trans. André Bernold [Paris: Le Cerf, 1988, p. 253])
Jacques Derrida, Demeure: Fiction and Testimony (Derrida, 2000, 113)

Due August 27 by 5 p.m. Two discussion questions numbered one and two, with your name at the top of the document, on Thomas Bernhard's The Loser, pp. 3-65. Just Your Name. Nothing else. Nothing. Else. Email your DQs in one word document with last name as the document title to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com.

August 28: The Loser as Mournful, Enraged, Neurotic, and Hilarious Novelist

Required Reading:

Thomas Bernhard, The Loser, pp. 3-99

Recommended Reading:

Thomas Bernhard, selection from Wittgenstein's Nephew, pp. 65-72

Edouard LevéSuicide and Auto-Portrait

John T. Irwin, The Poetry of Weldon Kees: Vanishing as Presence

"The Disappearing Poet
What Ever Happened to Weldon Kees?"

Due August 29 Two discussion questions, numbered one and two, and three BIG WORDS, on Thomas Bernhard's The Loser, pp. 3-99. Put your name at the top of the document. Just Your Name. Nothing else. Nothing. Else. Email all work to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com

August 30: Loser stream of consciousness raising

Required Reading:

Thomas Bernhard, The Loser, pp. 100-93

Due September 3: (You Know the Drill.) Two discussion questions on and three BIG WORDS, numbered one, two, and three. Put your name at the top of the document. Just Your Name. Nothing else. Nothing. Else. Email all work to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com I will no longer post this info below. DQs are always due by 5:30 the day before class.

"--If this text is incomprehensible to anyone and grates on their ears, then the blame as I see it does not necessarily lie with me.  It is clear enough, assuming as I assume one has read my  earlier writings and done so without sparing the considerable effort; these are in fact not easily accessible. For instance as concerns my Zarathrustra, I will regard no one as its connoisseur who at some time was not deeply wounded and at some time not deeply delighted by its every word: for only then may he enjoy the privilege of reverent participation in the halcyon element out of which it was born, in its sunny brilliance, distance, health, breadth and curiosity. In other cases the aphoristic form presents a difficulty: this is based on the fact that today this form is not taken seriously enough.  An aphorism that is properly stamped and poured is not yet "deciphered" just because someone has read it through; on the contrary, its interpretation must begin now, which requires an art of interpretation.  In the third treatise of this book I have offered a sample of what I call "interpretation" in such a case:--this treatise is preceded by an aphorism, and the treatise itself is a commentary.  Of course one thing above all is necessary in order to practice reading as an art to this extent, a skill that today has been unlearned best of all--which is why more time  must pass for my writings to be "readable"--something for which it is almost necessary to be a cow and in any case not a "modern man": rumination . . .

Sils maria,

UPPER ENGADINE,IN JULY 1887.

Friedrich NietzscheThe Genealogy of Morals

September 4:

Required Reading:

Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is, pp. 3-76 

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg,The Waste Books (New York Review Books Classics)

Due September 5: (You Know the Drill. I will no longer post due dates for DQs on the schedule below.)

September 6:

1. Required Reading: Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is, pp. 77-97

2. Required Viewing:

Avital Ronell, Complaints Department. 2015

Recommended Reading:

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, Genealogy of Morals,Third Treatise

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, Untimely Meditations 

September 11: TIMELINESS or UNTIMELY?: The Loser as the Great Hater, the Destructive Character, at War against War, the hermetic Journalist Anti-Journalist

Required Readings: You may either purchase The Kraus Project: Essays by Karl Kraus the book or read all assigned selections from it for free online here: The Kraus Project

1.“Heine and the Consequences,” The Kraus Project: Essays by Karl Kraus, pp. 6-80

2. "From Half-Truths & One-and-a-Half Truths: Selected Aphorisms of Karl Kraus, edited and translated by Harry Zohn, University of Chicago Press, 1990."

Recommended:

Draining the Swamp

Karl Kraus, One and a Half-Truths, edited and with an introduction by Harry Zohn

"Restore the Whore" The TLS

"Incomprehensibility" TheTLS

Erich Heller, "Karl Kraus: Satirist in the Modern World" in The Disinherited Mind (1952)

Erich Heller, "Karl Kraus: The Last Days of Mankind" in The Disinherited Mind (rev. 19??)

Erich Heller, "Dark Laughter" NYRB MAY 3, 1973

"On Karl Kraus" Walter Kaufmann, reply by Erich Heller NYRB AUGUST 9, 1973 

Friedrich Schlegel, "On Incomprehensibility"

Theodor W. Adorno, "On an Imaginary Feuilleton"

Karl Kraus, "Nestroy and Posterity"

Adam Kirsch, "The Torch of Karl Kraus," NYR, OCTOBER 23, 2008 ISSUE

Theodor W. Adorno, "Morality and Criminality"

KARL KRAUS Online

Die Fackel [The Torch]

Edward Timm, "Die Fackel," The TLS 2003

September 13: What is Criticism? (and what is not?) What is the relation between hatred and justice?

Required Reading: “Heine and the Consequences,” The Kraus Project: Essays by Karl Kraus, pp. 81-133

Recommended Readings:

Walter Benjamin, "False Criticism"

Marjorie Perloff, "On Jonathan Franzen’s The Kraus Project"

"Afterword to Heine and the Consequences," in The Kraus Project: Essays by Karl Kraus, pp. 264-93.

Karl Kraus, Against Heine

Walter Benjamin, "Journalism"

"All Hail the Grumbler!

Selections from "the Grumbler" and "Optimist" characters and "The Last Night" in Karl Kraus's The Last Days of Mankind, pp. 42-43; 128-54; 567-60.

TRANSLATING KARL KRAUS & THE LAST DAYS OF MANKIND

Karl Kraus, diplomatic transcriptions in German of Die Fackel, including Glossen (Franzen comapres them to modern blogs)

Karl Kraus, "Feuilleton und Bühne" In German

DIE FACKEL ONLINE

Failure (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art)

Walter Benjamin, Kraus Reads Offenbach

September 18: Requiem for a Hater

Required Readings:

1. Walter Benjamin, "Karl Kraus" (watch for the mention of Shakespeare's Timon of Athens)

This reading is in three sections. It is difficult. Leave yourself enough time to read it very carefully.

Recommended Readings:

Walter Benjamin, "Karl Kraus Fragment"

--Walter Benjamin, Einbahnstraße (One-Way Street).

Walter Benjamin, One-Way Street and Other Writings

Karl Kraus, "Die Verlassenen," Worte in Versen I.-IX. Worte in Versen V.

Selige Sehnsucht ist der Titel eines Gedichts von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Facing page translation

“Between Two Strains of Life: Final Word,” and "Let No One Ask," The Kraus Project: Essays by Karl Kraus, pp. 295-315. 

Walter Benjamin essays in pdfs

"So when confronted with stupidity I would rather confess my Achilles' heel right away: I don't know what it is. I have not discovered any theory of stupidity with whose aid I could presume to save the world; in fact, even within the limits of scientific discretion, I have not come across an investigation that has taken stupidity as its subject, nor have I found even some kind of unanimity that would, for better or worse, have resulted from treating related things with regard to the notion of stupidity. This might be due to my ignorance, but more likely the question, "What is stupidity?" corresponds as little to our current ways of thinking as do the questions of what goodness, beauty, or electricity are."

September 20:

Musil, Robert. "On Stupidity" in Precision and Soul: Essays and Addresses. Trans. Burton Pike and David S. Luft. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978. 268-86.

First Paper (500 words) DUE Saturday September 23 by 11:59 p.m.

Click here for the assignment. Email all work to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com

 

September 25: Epitaphs for a Loser

Required Reading:

William Shakespeare and Anthony Dawson, ed. Timon of Athens: Third Series (Arden Shakespeare) 

This edition is required. Get this edition. We will be reading part of the introduction and discursive footnotes as well.

--Erich Heller, "Karl Kraus: Satirist in the Modern World" in The Disinherited Mind (1952)

September 27:

Required Reading:

William Shakespeare and Anthony Dawson, ed. Timon of Athens: Third Series (Arden Shakespeare) 

This edition is required. Get it. We will be reading part of the introduction and discursive footnotes as well.

More Recommended Reading:

Kierkegaard on Journalism and Journalists

"The NEWSPAPER, is the second-hand in the clock of history; and it is not only made of baser metal than those which point to the minute and the hour, but it seldom goes right.

The so-called leading article is the chorus to the drama of passing events.

Exaggeration of every kind is as essential to journalism as it is to the dramatic art; for the object of journalism is to make events go as far as possible. Thus it is that all journalists are, in the very nature of their calling, alarmists; and this is their way of giving interest to what they write. Herein they are like little dogs; if anything stirs, they immediately set up a shrill bark.

Therefore, let us carefully regulate the attention to be paid to this trumpet of danger, so that it may not disturb our digestion. Let us recognize that a newspaper is at best but a magnifying-glass, and very often merely a shadow on the wall."

Karl Kraus on Kierkegaard and journalism

 Arthur Schopenhauer, "On Some Forms of Literature"

 

Søren Kierkegaard, The Present Age, A Literary Review

Kierkegaard skip reading it

October 4: The Disembodied Loser

Required Reading:

Robert Montgomery Bird, Sheppard Lee,Written By Himself Vol. 1 "Originally printed in two volumes, this edition combines them into one. (The first volume of the original edition ended after chapter 3 in book IV.)" --Christopher Looby

"Sheppard Lee is an identity thief. . . . Poe would have preferred an essentially constant narrative focus, a consciousness continually and con-sistently present to itself (and to Bird’s readers), from whose stable perspective the wide variety of social circumstances and events depicted in the novel would be perceived—circum-stances and events that, it might be, would slowly have an im- pact upon that consciousness. Such a protagonist might look different (because he changed bodies), and therefore pass as someone else in the eyes of others, but would retain a secure sense of self-identity nevertheless. Bird, however, dramatized another, quite different possibility: that identity would be nearly lost from one reincarnation to the next.

This seems, finally, to be Bird’s rather pointed agenda: to put his readers on notice that, in these fraught times of national struggle over slavery, and in the face of intractable political dilemmas, he could give no affordance for moralistic complacency of any sort." Christopher Looby, "Introduction," Sheppard Lee Written by Himself

Recommended Readings:

Robert Montgomery Bird, "My Friends in the Madhouse," Peter Pilgrim; Or, A Rambler's Recollections

James Kirke Paulding, Westward Ho!: A Tale

Stephen Burroughs, Memoirs of the Notorious Stephen Burroughs of New Hampshire (1811 edition; 1798 edition)

Ben Franklin, Autobiography

Edgar Allan Poe, "The Business Man"

October 6:

Required Reading:

Robert Montgomery Bird, Sheppard Lee, Written By Himself Vol. 2

Recommended Viewing:

October 9: "Er lasst sich nicht lesen"

Required Reading:

Edgar Allan Poe, "The Man of the Crowd"(online) (Or pdf here)

Recommended:

"Poe's famous tale "The Man of the Crowd" is something like an X-ray of a detective story. It does away with all the drapery that a crime represents. Only the armature remains: the pursuer, the crowd, and an unknown man who manages to walk through London in such a way that he always remains in the middle of the crowd. This unknown man is the flaneur. That is how Baudelaire understood him when, in his essay on Guys, he called the flaneur "l'homme des foules" [the man of the crowd]. But Poe's description of this figure is devoid of the connivance which Baudelaire's notion in- cluded. To Poe the flaneur was, above all, someone who does not feel comfortable in his own company. This is why he seeks out the crowd; the reason he hides in it is probably close at hand. Poe purposely blurs the difference between the asocial person and the flaneur. The harder a man is to find, the more suspicious he becomes. Refraining from a prolonged pursuit, the nar- rator quietly sums up his insight as follows: "'This old man is the embodiment and the spirit of crime,' I said to myself. 'He refuses to be alone. He is the man of the crowd."'

--Walter Benjamin on Poe, Charles Baudelaire, and the crowd

E.T.A. Hoffmann, "My Cousin's Corner Window"

Robert Louis Stevenson, "A Plea for Gas Lamps" 

Walter Benjamin, "The Flâneur" in The Paris of the Second Empire in Baudelaire (1938)

Gustave Caillebotte, "Paris Street, Rainy Day"

Walter Benjamin, "Return of the Flâneur" (a rview of Franz Hessel's book, Walking in Berlin)

October 11: The Disembodied Loser

Required Reading:

William Faulkner, Barn Burning

If you need to read more, see https://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/01/magazine/how-william-faulkner-tackled-race-and-freed-the-south-from-itself.html

https://www.vqronline.org/essay/faulkner-and-race-art-and-punditry

https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2tv7hf

October 16:

Required Reading: No Refuge for the Loser

J.-K. Huysmans, A Haven [En Rade], in The Decadent Reader: Fiction, Fantasy, and Perversion from Fin-de-Siecle France Ed, Asti Hustvedt, 1999

Recommended Reading:

Michel Houellebecq, Submission (English translation, 2016)

Roundtable discussion of Submission

October 18:

Required Reading:

Avital Ronell, "Introduction" in Complaint: Grievance among Friends (2018)

Recommended Reading:

Walter Benjamin, "Privileged Thinking"

Paul de Man, "The Concept of Irony," in Aesthetic Ideology

Executive Order: Images of 1970s Corporate America

Recommended Viewing:

Idiocracy (dir. Mike Judge, 2006)

The King of Comedy (dir. Martin Scorcese, 1982)

October 23:

Required Reading:

Herman Melville, Bartleby the Scrivener: A Tale of Wall Street

October 25:

Required Rereading:

1. Herman Melville, Bartleby the Scrivener: A Tale of Wall Street

2. Anonymous, My Wife and the Wall Street Phantom (1870)

Recommended Viewing and Reading:

Gilles Deleuze, "Bartleby; or, The Formula," in Essays Critical and Clinical, pp. 68-90.

Office Space (dir. Mike Judge, 1999)

Sigmund Freud, "Creative Writers and Day-Dreaming (Der Dichter und das Phantasieren)" (1908)

October 30:

Required Readings:

Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument 

November 1:

Required Reading:

Friedrich Schlegel, "On Incomprehensibility"

Recommended:

Avital Ronell, "The Uninterrogated Question of Stupidity." differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies.
8.2 (Summer 1996)

Second Paper (500 words) DUE Sunday November 4 by 11:59 p.m. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text or is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out your title after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :)

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, your grade is an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

Live GRADING

November 6:

Required Readings:

1. Franz Kafka, "Before the Law"

2. Franz Kafka, "Before the Law" in the Cathedral Chapter of The Trial.

Recommended Reading:

"Before the Law: "Three Years on Rikers Without Trial" The New Yorker


November 8:

Required Listening:

Franz Kafka, "Before the Law" (Orson Welles)

Required Readings:

Jacques Derrida, "Before the Law" in Jacques Derrida,‎ Sandra van Reenen and Jacques de Ville (Translators), Before the Law: The Complete Text of Préjugés (2018)

November 13:

Required Reading:

Jacques Derrida, "Before the Law" Jacques Derrida,‎ Sandra van Reenen and Jacques de Ville (Translators), Before the Law: The Complete Text of Préjugés (2018)

Recommended Reading:

"Kafka’s Last Trial" - NYTimes

Kakfa and Max Brod

Habeas Corpus / The End of Habeas Corpus

Max Brod's "readings" of Kafka's will in three postscripts Brod wrote to three successive editions of The Trial.

November 15:

Reading Reading:

Franz Kafka, "The Judgment," trans M. Hoffman; or read the Muirs' translation; or read Stanley Corngold's translation.

(Not really) Recommended Reading:

Stanley Corngold's essay on "The Judgment."

November 20:

Reading Reading:

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire, pp. 11-110.

November 22:

Required Reading:

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire, pp. 110-210.

Recommended Readings:

Pale Fire: A Poem in Four Cantos by John Shade 2011 

Dmitri Nabokov, Original of Laura

Yuri Leving, ed. Shades of Laura: Vladimir Nabokov's Last Novel, The Original of Laura Oct 28, 2013

November 27:

Required Reading:

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire, 211-315.

Thanksgiving

December 4:

Required Reading:

Alexander Pushkin, Queen of Spades

Recommended Readings:

Stefan Zweig, Twenty-four Hours in the Life of a Woman

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Gambler

Paper (50 words) due December 3 by 5:00 p.m. (please email it to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com).

Loser versus loser. Me?

In the neoliberal imagination, there is no room for losers. But their elimination is perpetually deferred non-future of total winnerdom.

"Our stupid century" --Thomas Frank

https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/spinoza-philosophy-freedom/

What we won't have read this semester but might have:

Valerie Solanas, SCUM Manifesto

Jack Black,‎ You Can't Win

Joe Coleman (Illustrator),‎ William S. Burroughs (Foreword)

Gustave Flaubert, Bouvard and Pécuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel of Bourgeois Life

Gustave Flaubert, Dictionnaire des Idées Reçues

Required Reading:

Edgar Allan Poe, "The Mystery of Marie Roget" (the detective Dupin relies on press reports to solve the crime)

Recommended:

Walter Benjamin on Poe, Charles Baudelaire, and the crowd

Louis Huart, Physiology of the Flâneur, 1841

Death to the Flâneur

In Praise of the Flâneur

The Flâneur Discovers Paris, a Step at a Time

 

Henry James, THE ASPERN PAPERS 
As soon as I came into the room I saw that she had drawn this inference, but I also saw something which had not been in my forecast. Poor Miss Tita’s sense of her failure had produced an extraordinary alteration in her, but I had been too full of my literary concupiscence to think of that. Now I perceived it; I can scarcely tell how it startled me. She stood in the middle of the room with a face of mildness bent upon me, and her look of forgiveness, of absolution, made her angelic. It beautified her; she was younger; she was not a ridiculous old woman. This optical trick gave her a sort of phantasmagoric brightness, and while I was still the victim of it I heard a whisper somewhere in the depths of my conscience: “Why not, after all—why not?” It seemed to me I was ready to pay the price. Still more distinctly however than the whisper I heard Miss Tita’s own voice. I was so struck with the different effect she made upon me that at first I was not clearly aware of what she was saying; then I perceived she had bade me goodbye—she said something about hoping I should be very happy. “Goodbye—goodbye?” I repeated with an inflection interrogative and probably foolish. I saw she did not feel the interrogation, she only heard the words; she had strung herself up to accepting our separation and they fell upon her ear as a proof. “Are you going today?” she asked. “But it doesn’t matter, for whenever you go I shall not see you again. I don’t want to.” And she smiled strangely, with an infinite gentleness. She had never doubted that I had left her the day before in horror. How could she, since I had not come back before night to contradict, even as a simple form, such an idea? And now she had the force of soul—Miss Tita with force of soul was a new conception—to smile at me in her humiliation. “What shall you do—where shall you go?” I asked. “Oh, I don’t know. I have done the great thing. I have destroyed the papers.” “Destroyed them?” I faltered. “Yes; what was I to keep them for? I burned them last night, one by one, in the kitchen.” “One by one?” I repeated, mechanically. “It took a long time—there were so many.” The room seemed to go round me as she said this, and a real darkness for a moment descended upon my eyes. When it passed Miss Tita was there still, but the transfiguration was over and she had changed back to a plain, dingy, elderly person. It was in this character she spoke as she said, “I can’t stay with you longer, I can’t;” and it was in this character that she turned her back upon me, as I had turned mine upon her twenty-four hours before, and moved to the door of her room. Here she did what I had not done when I quitted her—she paused long enough to give me one look. I have never forgotten it and I sometimes still suffer from it, though it was not resentful. No, there was no resentment, nothing hard or vindictive in poor Miss Tita; for when, later, I sent her in exchange for the portrait of Jeffrey Aspern a larger sum of money than I had hoped to be able to gather for her, writing to her that I had sold the picture, she kept it with thanks; she never sent it back. I wrote to her that I had sold the picture, but I admitted to Mrs. Prest, at the time (I met her in London, in the autumn), that it hangs above my writing table. When I look at it my chagrin at the loss of the letters becomes almost intolerable.
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/211/211-h/211-h.htm

 

The Spoils of Poynton
By Henry James
She felt sick; she sank upon a seat, staring up at him. "Do you mean that great house is lost?"
"It was near it, I was told, an hour ago—the fury of the flames had got such a start. I was there myself at six, the very first I heard of it. They were fighting it then, but you couldn't quite say they had got it down."
Fleda jerked herself up. "Were they saving the things?"
"That's just where it was, miss—to get at the blessed things. And the want of right help—it maddened me to stand and see 'em muff it. This ain't a place, like, for anything organized. They don't come up to a reel emergency."
She passed out of the door that opened toward the village and met a great acrid gust. She heard a far-off windy roar which, in her dismay, she took for that of flames a mile away, and which, the first instant, acted upon her as a wild solicitation. "I must go there." She had scarcely spoken before the same omen had changed into an appalling check.
Her vivid friend, moreover, had got before her; he clearly suffered from the nature of the control he had to exercise. "Don't do that, miss—you won't care for it at all." Then as she waveringly stood her ground, "It's not a place for a young lady, nor, if you'll believe me, a sight for them as are in any way affected."
Fleda by this time knew in what way she was affected: she became limp and weak again; she felt herself give everything up. Mixed with the horror, with the kindness of the station-master, with the smell of cinders and the riot of sound, was the raw bitterness of a hope that she might never again in life have to give up so much at such short notice. She heard herself repeat mechanically, yet as if asking it for the first time: "Poynton's gone?"
The man hesitated. "What can you call it, miss, if it ain't really saved?"
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/33325/33325-h/33325-h.htm

John T. Irwin, The Poetry of Weldon Kees: Vanishing as Presence

Carl Gustav Jochmann , Heinrich Zschokke Carl Gustav Jochmann's, von Pernau, Reliquien: Aus seinen nachgelassenen Papieren Publication date 

"The Disappearing Poet
What Ever Happened to Weldon Kees?"

Messiness & Creativity: How a Messy Desk and Creative Work Go Hand in Hand

Finding Your Way into a Literary Work: Reading as Invention (Inventio) and as Discovery (Why those two words?) Criticism is Creative (Writing).

"Wildered" Percy Shelley, Alastor, l.140

Etymology / Online Etymology Dictionary

Reading the Table of Contents

Gérard Genette, Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation 

PDF is here. 

Table of Contents pdf of Introduction Here.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Yellow Wall-Paper and Other Stories

 


The Kafka Project

Kafka's Wound

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, Genealogy of Morals,Third Treatise

Martin Heidegger, selections from Being and Time and The Basic Concepts of Metaphysics; and "The Essence of Ground," in Pathmarks

Arthur Schopenhauer, "On Noise," in Studies in Pessimism

Mohamedou Ould Slahi, Larry Siems (Editor) Guantánamo Diary 2015

Maurice Blanchot, The Instant of My Death 

How Guantánamo Diary Escaped the Black Hole

Innocent and Guilty Prisoners: Eleven Years without Charges at Gitmo

Habeas Corpus in the U.S. (Infinite Detention: the National Defense Authorization Act signed by President Obama on December 31st, 2011 / 2013)

friedrich-nietzsche-thus-spoke-zarathustra-a-book-for-all-and-none-translated-by-adrian-del-caro-1.pdf

Maurice Blanchot, "Literature and the Right to Death," in The Work of Fire, trans. Charlotte Mandell and Lydia Davis (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995), 300-43.

Franz Kafka, In the Penal Colony or here. The German is here. Note the frequent use of the word "Urteil," meaning "verdict," "judgment," or "sentence," the same word Kafka used as the title of The Judgement aka The Verdict (Das Urteil). 

Richard Thieberger, "The Botched Ending of In the Pelany Colony,The Kafka Debate. Ed. Ange Flores

Michel de Montaigne, "Of CoachesEssays, Book Three, Chapter Six.

Jacques Derrida, Death Penalty Seminar, Vol. 1, Session Eleven, pp. 270-83.

Michel de Montaigne, "To His Father: On the Death of La Boétie," in Complete Works of Montaigne, Trans. Donald Frame, 1276-88.

Seneca, "On the Shortness of Life"

Maurice Blanchot, "The Last Word" in Friendship (1971; trans 1997)

Maurice Blanchot, "The Very Last Word" in Friendship (1971; trans 1997) 

Jean-Jacques RousseauReveries of a Solitary Walker, "Second Promenade"

Maurice Blanchot, "Idle Speech," from Friendship.

Jacques Derrida, "Fichus" and selected letters written by Walter Benjamin that Derrida discusses in "Fichus."

Jacques Derrida, "Force of Law"

Walter Benjamin, "Critique of Violence"

Friedrich Theodor Vischer, The Rabid Philosopher and Auch Einer: Eine Reisebekanntschaft (in English); Heimito von Doderer, "Eight Attacks of Rage" and "The Torture of the
Little Leather Pouches," in A Person Made of Porcelain and Other
Stories
; Seneca, "On Anger"Friedrich Theodor Vischer, "A Rabid Philosopher"

Jörg Kreienbrock, Malicious Objects, Anger Management, and the
Question of Modern Literature

Kirk Wetters, Demonic History: From Goethe to the Present (2015)

What is an ideologue? What is an intellectual? What is fake news? How do you decide if a source is reliable? Glenn greenwald at the Intercept versus Jimmy Dore show versus Max Keiser Report versus Alex Jones at infowars

SENIORS WITH STUDENTS / THE RE-ABLED BODY

Apocalyse Now

Avital Ronnel, Loser Sons

Kathy Acker, Don Quixote

Jack London, "To Build a Fire"--sabotage

CIA Manual for Purposeful Stupdity

William Faulkner, A Rose for Emily

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, "Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
T.S. Eliot, "The Wasteland"
William Empson, "Obscurity and Annotation"
Thomas Bernhard, Extinction
Thomas Bernhard, Correction
Franz Kafka, The Verdict
Franz Kafka, Before the Law

Edgar Allen Poe, William Wilson

Stefan Zweig, Amok

Nathaniel Hawthorne, Wakefield

MAX OPHULS, LETTER FROMAN UNKNOWN WOMAN

EDGAR G. ULMER, DETOUR

Edouard LevéSuicide and Auto-Portrait

Hart Crane, selected poems
Sigmund Freud, A Child Is Being Beaten
Paul Roazen, Brother Animal: The Story of Freud and Tausk

Samuel Beckett, From an Abandoned Work

James Joyce, "The Dead"

Shepard Tone

 

Pareidolia and apophenia

Yanny vs Laurel video: which name do you hear? 

Oblique Perspective in Hans Holbein's The Ambassadors (anamorphosis); Jacques Derrida on oblique reading in Passion: An Oblique Offering

, Art and illusion: A study in the psychology of pictorial representation

John Lee HookerCharlie Musselwhite

Help Me

Mr. Lisa's Opus

Gadaj?ce g?owy / Talking Heads (1980)

Changing the Paradigm 2015 Developmental Trauma Panel | Dr. Bessel van der Kolk

Behind the Globe Article