Discussion Questions are always due by 5:00 p.m. the day before we meet for class.

Email all work to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE (Please expect minor adjustments to be made in the schedule from time to time; all changes will be announced both in class and on the class email listserv; this webpage will also be updated.)

Email all work to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com

RESEMBLANCE AND ITS LIMITS

January 9:

Copy That / Copy

“How do we know it’s not a fake?” The art auction scene in Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest

William Goldsmith, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age

Recommended Reading:

Neoliberalism: "Manage" . . . . , not "organize."

Ann M. Blair, Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information before the Modern Age

Ideas (canon of "great" works of general interest) versus Excellence (the content free corporate university)

Casino Capitalism (Literally)

Firsts!

(2007

Due January 10 by 5 p.m.: Two discussion questions numbered one and two, on Juan Luis Borges, "Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote." Put your name at the top of the document. Email all work to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com I will no longer post this notice on the schedule below since you should understand the assignment, unless otherwise specified by me, and the due dates (Mondays and Wednesdays by 5 p.m.) by now. Please send me only a word doc or a word docx. Do not send me anything on google drive, etc. Thanks.

January 11 Copy It Exactly

Required Reading:

Juan Luis Borges, "Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote"

Pierre Menard, autor del Quijote (El jardín de senderos que se bifurcan (1941; Ficciones, 1944)

Recommended Reading (Optional):

Paul de Man reviewing Borges, in "A Modern Master" (1964)

Michel Foucault citing Borges in essay on Steiner, "Monstrosities in Criticism"

George Steiner, Steiner Responds to Foucault, Diacritics Vol. 1, No. 2 (Winter, 1971), p. 59

GEORGE STEINER, "The Mandarin of the Hour Michel Foucault," NYRB February 28, 1971

Due January 15 by 5 p.m.: Two discussion questions numbered one and two, on William Goldsmith, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age, pp. 1-13; 201-17 and your word by word, line by line, page by page annotations on Juan Luis Borges, "Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote." Put your name at the top of the document. Email all work to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com I will no longer post this notice on the schedule below since you should understand the assignment, unless otherwise specified by me, and the due dates (Mondays and Wednesdays by 5 p.m.) by now. Please send me only a word doc or a word docx. Do not send me anything on google drive, etc. Thanks.

January 16 Un-Managed Writing:

(Un)Required Reading:

1. Reread Juan Luis Borges, "Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote" and this time annotate it (look up any name you do not recognize or any place name you do not recognize or anything else the average reader will not know).

2. William Goldsmith, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age, pp. 1-13; 201-17.

January 18 UnArchiving Writing

Required Reading:

Herman Melville, Bartleby, The Scrivener: A Story Of Wall-street

Recommended Reading:

Sigmund Freud, "Creative Writers and Day-Dreaming (Der Dichter und das Phantasieren)" (1908)

January 23 Mis-Managed Writing

Required Reading:

Kathy Acker, Don Quixote: A Novel ("Read" through the novel and then read any 60 pages of the novel you wish to read with these two constraints; first, you must make at least six selections; and second. at least three of your selections must be two or more consecutive pages long.)

January 25

Required Reading:

Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote (trans. Tobias Smollet), Part One, Chapter IX, Chapter XXII; Chapter XXVI; Chapter XXXVIII; Prologue and First Part, Part One; Second Part, Dedication and Prologue to the Reader, Chapter LXXIV (the final chapter of the novel)

Recommended Viewing:

Don Quixote (dir. Orson Welles, 1991)

First Paper Due Saturday January 27 by 11:59 p.m.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out your title after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :) Also, please insert image captures as needed.

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, your grade is an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

Live GRADING

January 30

Required Viewing: F for Fake (dir. Orson Welles, 1975)

Recommended Reading: Clifford Irving, FAKE! The Story of Elmyr de Hory, the Greatest Art Forger of Our Time (I own an autograpged copy. Irving died December 22, 2017)

Recommended Viewing:

Two fake Picassos are used in Basic Instinct, along with several nods to Orson Welles's Touch of Evil, in Basic Instinct (dir. Paul Verhoeven, 1992).

February 2

Required Viewing: Wormwood (dir. Errol Morris 2017) on Netflix, episodes 1-2

Recommended Viewing:

Laurence Olivier's Hamlet (1948)

February 13

Required Viewing: Wormwood (dir. Errol Morris 2017) on Netflix, episodes 3-4

February 15 Forensics, or Fauxrensics?

Required Viewing: Wormwood (dir. Errol Morris 2017) on Netflix, episodes 5-6

Recommended Viewing:

The Thin Blue Line (dir. Errol Morris, 1988)

February 20

Eric Hebborn, The Art Forger's Handbook (selected pages on pdf)

February 22

Required Viewing:

Tim's Vermeer (dir. Mark Penn, 2013)

February 27

Required Reading:

Errol Morris "Vermeer Forgery" NY Times (article)on "Vermeer Forgery" NY Times (Images); (CLICK BOTH MORRIS LINKS, article and images) X-Ray, DNA evidence in estasblishing painting forgeries. Connoisseurs versus fingerprints and other forensic evidence.

Reprinted in Believing Is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography

Recommended:

VAN GOGH Repetitions Exhibition

Van Gogh Repetitions, ed. Eliza Rathbone, William H. Robinson, Steele Elizabeth and Marcia Steele

Titian Remade: Repetition and the Transformation of Early Modern Italian Art 

Optional Reading: Morelli on art collecting; David Grann, "The Mark of a Masterpiece: The man who keeps finding famous fingerprints on uncelebrated works of art"; Painter charged with making fake Jackson Pollock paintings (July 2014); Mark Segoff, "Restoring and Reproducing Art"; Dutch Still Lives (17th Ct.) with x-rays of layers of paintStill Lives with online annotation popupsL#st F*ct%ons: Caragio's Musan

March 1 to March 11 SPRING BREAK

March 13: I Can Do What They Did Better:

Required Reading:

Marcel Proust, The Lemoine Affair, pp. tba

March 15

Required Reading:

Neil Hertz on plagiarism and punishment: "Two Extravagant Teachings," The End of the Line, pp. 155-70.

Unrecommended Reading (Not Required):

William Goldsmith, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age, pp. tba

March 20 Literary History Break (two classes)

Required Reading:

Laurence Sterne's sermon "The Abuses of Conscience" recycled in Tristram Shandy , Volume 2, and Robert Burton's "Democritus Junior to the Reader," in Anatomy of Melancholy--in the late 16th ct, accusations of plagiarism begin but it really get going in the 18th ct. "Borrowing" is a kind of euphemism for theft.

Recommended Reading:

Joseph Lowenstein, “Martial, Jonson, and the Assertion of Plagiarism,” Reading, Society, and Politics in Early Modern England, eds. Steven Zwicker and Kevin Sharpe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

March 22

Required Reading:

Ireland, W. H. and White, Richard Grant, The Confessions of William Henry Ireland, containing the particulars of his fabrication of the Shakespeare Manuscript

Recommended Reading:

John Payne Collier, 1789-1883, Notes and emendations to the text of Shakespeare's plays from early manuscript corrections in a copy of the folio, 1632, in the possession of J. Payne Collier

Arthur Freeman, Janet Ing Freeman, John Payne Collier: Scholarship and Forgery in the Nineteenth Century, Volumes 1 and 2

March 27

Second Paper (500 words) DUE Saturday March 29 by 11:59 p.m. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text or is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out your title after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :) Also, please insert image captures as needed.

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, your grade is an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

Live GRADING

March 29 The Art of Counterfeiting

Required Reading:

Charles Baudelaire, "Counterfeit Money"

Recommended Reading:

Jacques Derrida, Given Time: 1. Counterfeit Money

April 3

Required Reading:

Leo Tolstoy, "The Forged Coupon"

April 5

Required Viewing:

L'Argent (dir. Robert Bresson, 1983)

April 10

Required Viewing:

The Counterfeiters (dir. Stefan Ruzowitzky, 2007)

April 12

Required Viewing:

T-Men (dir. Anthony Mann, 1947)

April 17

Required Reading:

Carlo Ginzburg, "Morelli, Freud, and Sherlock Holmes: Clues and Scientific Method" (1984)

Optional Reading: D.A. Greetham, "Textual Forensics"; Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "A Case of Identity" (1899) and "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box" (1893); Sigmund Freud, "The Moses of Michelangelo" (1914) Standard Edition, 13: 209-238. Digital "Exploded Manuscript" of Freud's essay.

April 19

Required Reading:

Post-truth politics: Carlo Ginzburg and the trails of microhistory

Carlo Ginzburg, "Minutiae, Close-up, Microanalysis."  Translated by S. R. Gilbert.

April 24

Required Reading:

J.S.C. Boggs Obituary in the NY Times

Lawrence Weschler, "VALUE I--A FOOL'S QUESTIONS," New Yorker, January 18, 1988 Issue Lawrence Weschler, "VALUE II--CONFUSIONS AND ANXIETIES," New Yorker,January 25, 1988 Issue?

Recommended Reading:

Lawrence Weschler, Boggs: A Comedy of Values

Final Paper (500 words) due April 23 by 5:00 p.m. (please email it to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com).

I'll have to teach the class twice to see if I can do again what I did here exactly. I'll make a movie of what I do each class this semester. And then next semester the transcription and descriptions of what I've done will be my script in class every class. But since you are all new, I'll have to say whatever I'm saying now again only to different students who will therefore not know how to respond to me since there will be silences to indicate the times I wasn't speaking. Students may fill the voids. Or I could play the recording for you each class. Would it be the same class?

Required Readings:

 

Paolo Cherchi Usai, David Alexander Horwath, Michael Loebenstein, ed. Film Curatorship: Museums, Curatorship and the Moving Image (chapter three, pp.107-29)

 

The Wizard of Oz "Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain."

Fake Book Covers David Byrne / Fake Criterion Covers

 

Paolo Cherchi Uschai, Silent Cinema: An Introduction Chapter Three on "The Ethics of Film Preservation," pp. 44-76

 

Optional Reading:

Jorge Luis Borges, "Funes el memorioso." English trans.

Jorge Luis Borges's "Funes el memorioso." Spanish