Cutting It Short: Literature as Suicide Note

Walter Benjamin, Seneca, "On the Shortness of Life," Roland Barthes, Franz Kafka, "The Judgment," Albert Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus, Jacques Derrida, "The Deaths of Roland Barthes"

Weldon Kees, Poems and Short Stories

John T. Irwin, The Poetry of Weldon Kees: Vanishing as Presence 2017

Slvyia Plath, The Bell Jar and The Ghostly Archive

Virginia Woolf, The Hours

Robert Schumann, Late violin sonata

Edouard Leve

Writers who stoped publishing Artur Rimbaud, J. D. Salinger

Life

Screen captures (just hip capture option on vlc player vs scren capture--put onclosed cpation, then screen grab = screen captchas--

Howard Beale and Dylan Ratigan on bank wealth extraction

Still Life?

 

Hart Crane, The Bridge

 

 

John Irwin Vanishing as Appearance

 

Is there a book in this class?

Please read the Class Policies page now.

This may be a somewhat expensive course as you will have to purchase or rent three hard copy editions of literary works we will be reading. They are:

1. Susan J. Wolfson and Ronald Levao, Ed. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Annotated Frankenstein

2, Mary Shelley, The Original Frankenstein (Vintage Classics)
Charles E. Robinson (Editor), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Collaborator)

3. Edgar Allan Poe (Author), Kevin J. Hayes (Editor), William Giraldi (Foreword) The Annotated Poe  2015

Click here for the rest of the required books.

Email all work for the course to me at richardburt33@gmail.com

You need to purchase or ent a copy of this edition of Michel Foucault, Madness and Civilization, Jean Khalfa and Jonathan Murphy, 2006. It is the only comeplete translation.

All beginnings are dangerous.--The poet has the choice of either raising feeling from one step to the next and thus eventually increasing it to a very high level--or else attempting a sudden onslaught and pulling the bell-rope with all his might from the beginning: both have their dangers: in the first case, that his audience may flee out of boredom, in the second, out of fear.

--Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human II, "Mixed Opinions and and Maxims," section 163, ed. Gary Handwerk (Stanford UP, 2013), 67.

Stone Soup

If you are OK with getting a C, you signed up for the wong course. You may have heard people make a pun on the word "class" in "class struggle," the struggle being fought out in the classroom. You may not realize it, but this classroom is your battlefield. And you may be the among the walking wounded and not even know it. Your professor is like a doctor performing triage. In a class with this many students, he or he has to decide who he or she can reach and teach. Any student who appears, intentionally or not, to be uninterested in learning will be cinisdred a zombie and left for dead, or regarded as lost among the walking dead. Better for to walk now and find a cold class frozen in your time.

Attendance is mandatory, and all assigned work for the course must be completed and be of passing quality to pass the course. We will learn collaboratively. I will not lecture at you while you try to stay awake. To make discussion productive, you and your fellow students must come prepared to participate in class discussion. This is a new and somewhat experimental course that I have designed. It is not a course where you can skip class, do 70 percent of the assigned work, and expect to get a C in the course. Because of the large number of students in the class, I may not notice that you have not been completing the work until the end of the term. In that case, you will receive an E. And that will be very, very sad for everyone. :( We must all be respectful and responsive for class discussion to work. Learning is not a task. And multi-tasking in class is taboo and reason for expulsion on the spot. So best to keep your electronic devices closed during class.

Requirements: TOTAL ATTENDANCE; Co-lead class discussion twice, once on a Tuesday and once on a Thursday; two discussion questions on two film shots; and three or more "BIG WORDS" for each class; student formulated quizzes each class; three 700 word papers; and a willingness to reflect, think, respond, by paying very, VERY, VERY close formal attention to texts and films. I wil be asking you to learn how to do something no one will have asked you to do: close reading.

Tentative Schedule: (Please expect changes to be made in the schedule from time to time during the semester--they will be announced well ahead of time both in class and by email).

January 5 Introduction:

The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship - edited by Neil Fraistat.

Textual Criticism

Textual Corruption

Ten Commandments King James Version: Exodus

15 And Moses turned, and went down from the mount, and the two tables of the testimony were in his hand: the tables were written on both their sides; on the one side and on the other were they written.
16 And the tables were the work of God, and the writing was the writing of God, graven upon the tables.

19 And it came to pass, as soon as he came nigh unto the camp, that he saw the calf, and the dancing: and Moses' anger waxed hot, and he cast the tables out of his hands, and brake them beneath the mount.

King James Version: Exodus Chapter 34

And the LORD said unto Moses, Hew thee two tables of stone like unto the first: and I will write upon these tables the words that were in the first tables, which thou brakest.
2 And be ready in the morning, and come up in the morning unto mount Sinai, and present thyself there to me in the top of the mount.
3 And no man shall come up with thee, neither let any man be seen throughout all the mount; neither let the flocks nor herds feed before that mount.
4 And he hewed two tables of stone like unto the first; and Moses rose up early in the morning, and went up unto mount Sinai, as the LORD had commanded him, and took in his hand the two tables of stone.
5 And the LORD descended in the cloud, and stood with him there, and proclaimed the name of the LORD.

Book of Mark, the version that all the other versions try to amplify and emend.

14 Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread, neither had they in the ship with them more than one loaf.

15 And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and of the leaven of Herod.

16 And they reasoned among themselves, saying, It is because we have no bread.

17 And when Jesus knew it, he saith unto them, Why reason ye, because ye have no bread? perceive ye not yet, neither understand? have ye your heart yet hardened?

18 Having eyes, see ye not? and having ears, hear ye not? and do ye not remember?

19 When I brake the five loaves among five thousand, how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? They say unto him, Twelve.

20 And when the seven among four thousand, how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? And they said, Seven.

21 And he said unto them, How is it that ye do not understand?

And here is your first assignment, due Monday, January 9 by 5 p.m.

Two discussion questions, numbered one and two and two discussion questions on Susan J. Wolfson and Ronald Levao, Ed. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Annotated Frankenstein, numbered one and two, and three BIG WORDS, with your name at the bottom of the document, are due by 5 ​p.m Monday January 10. . Email all work for the course to me at richardburt33@gmail.com. Don't forget to put your name in the document and in the document heading at the bottom, after your DQs, as in "yournamehere.doc." YOUR DOCUMENT SHOULD LOOK LIKE THIS.

DQs etc. Are Always Due the day before class by 5 p.m. on Mondays and by 5 p.m. Wednesdays for the rest of the semester.

January 10:

Required Reading:

Susan J. Wolfson and Ronald Levao, Ed. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Annotated Frankenstein

January 12:

Required Reading:

Susan J. Wolfson and Ronald Levao, Ed. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Annotated Frankenstein

January 17

Required Reading:

Mary Shelley, The Original Frankenstein (Vintage Classics)
Charles E. Robinson (Editor), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Collaborator)

January 19:

Required Reading:

Mary Shelley, The Original Frankenstein (Vintage Classics)
Charles E. Robinson (Editor), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Collaborator)

Recommended Reading:

Stephen Hebron and Elizabeth C. Denlinger, Shelley's Ghost: Reshaping the Image of a Literary Family


First Paper (700 words) DUE Saturday JANUARY 21 by 11:59 p.m. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text or is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out yourtitle after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :)

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, it's an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

January 24:

Required Reading:

Robert Falcon Scott, Captain Scott's Last Expedition (Oxford World's Classics)

January 26:

The Great White Silence / 90 Degrees South (DVD + Blu-ray) [1924]

January 31:

Required Reading:

Robert Falcon Scott, Captain Scott's Last Expedition (Oxford World's Classics)

February 2:

Required Reading:

Apsley Cherry-Garrard, The Worst Journey In The World (Vintage Classics)


February 7:

The Epic of Everest (DVD + Blu-ray)

February 9:

Required Reading:

Apsley Cherry-Garrard, The Worst Journey In The World (Vintage Classics)

February 14:

Required Reading:

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire


February 16:

Required Reading:

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire

February 21:

Required Reading:

Gerard Genette, Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation

v

Recommended Readings:

Pale Fire: A Poem in Four Cantos by John Shade 2011

Dmitri Nabokov, Original of Laura

Yuri Leving, ed. Shades of Laura: Vladimir Nabokov's Last Novel, The Original of Laura Oct 28, 2013

February 23:

Required Reading:

Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (Oxford World's Classics)

February 28:

Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (Oxford World's Classics)

March 7: Spring Break

March 9: Spring Break

March 14:

Required Reading:

Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness and Other Tales (Oxford World's Classics)

Recommended Reading:

Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness' and Contemporary Thought: Revisiting the Horror with Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe

March 16:

Required Viewing:

Gerard Genette, Palimpsests

Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness and Other Tales (Oxford World's Classics)

Second Paper (700 words) DUE Saturday March 18 by 11:59 p.m. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Your assignment is to do a close reading of an assigned text. Focus on a passage or a scene and discuss it in detail. That passage or scene is your paper topic. Cite the text or film to make your points. Develop your thesis. The text or is your evidence. If you don't know what a close reading is and have never done one before, be sure to go to http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading. You may also ask me for clarification. You must also know how to write a research paper, or analytical essay. You will need a title for your paper and a thesis, an argument that you can state in one sentence. Your thesis should go at the end of your first paragraph. To make sure we share the same understanding of the assigned paper, please read http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/paper.html before you begin writing. You may figure out your title before you write your paper, but usually, you only figure out yourtitle after you figure out your thesis. And you figure out your thesis by writing your paper. What you think is your conclusion often needs to be moved up from the end of the essay to the front. Then you are ready to make your final revisions and add a new concluding paragraph. You may also have come up with a new title in the course of writing the paper. And then you are ready to proofread your paper. And then you will have finished writing your paper. Congratulations! :)

Email your paper (as an attachment) to me at richardaburt22@gmail.com. Put your name in the subject title or header of your title. Put your name in your paper.

Grading: I will meet with you in person to discuss your paper with you. PLEASE BE ADVISED: If you didn't do the asignment, a close reading, it's an automatic E. If didn't put your name on your paper, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a proper title, it's an automatic E. If you didn't have a thesis, it's an automatic E. One third of your grade will be based on your title; one third on your thesis; and one third on the rest of your paper.

March 21:

Reich, James Mistah Kurtz! A Prelude to Heart of Darkness

March 23:


Edgar Allan Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, and Related Tales (Oxford World's Classics)

March 28:

Required Reading:

Edgar Allan Poe (Author), Kevin J. Hayes (Editor), William Giraldi (Foreword) The Annotated Poe  2015

March 30:

Required Reading:

Jules Verne, The Sphinx of the Ice Realm

April 4:

Required Reading:

Mat Johnson, Pym: A Novel

April 6:

H. P. Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories

April 11:

Required Reading:

Charles Dickens, Mystery of Edwin Drood (Oxford World's Classics)

Jacques Derrida Beast and the Sovereign Vol. 1

April 13:

Required Reading:

Charles Dickens, Mystery of Edwin Drood (Oxford World's Classics)

April 18:

Required Reading:

Washington Irving and Susan Manning, “Rip van Winkle”The Sketch-Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent (Oxford World's Classics)