The Last Dog

Tentative Schedule: (Please expect changes to be made in the schedule from time to time during the semester--they will be announced well ahead of time both in class and by email).

January 5: Introduction to Textual Criticism in Print and Online: Close Reading the Annotations

Reading Print (paper) and Searching Online with google books as a supplement. Wikipedia is a useful place to begin learning. Close reading is not just slow reading. It is also geting up to speed getting up to speed reading. Why close reading matters: "The fog is not coincidental: if the report’s vague assertions were clarified and its circular logic straightened out, nothing would be left."

How Guantánamo Diary Escaped the Black Hole

January 10: Finding Your Way into a Literary work: Reading as Invention (Inventio) and as Discovery (Why those two words?) Criticism is Creative (Writing).

"Wildered" Percy Shelley, Alastor, l.140

Etymology / Online Etymology Dictionary

Reading the Table of Contents

Mary Shelley's title pages

Required Reading:

Susan J. Wolfson and Ronald Levao, Ed. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Annotated Frankenstein, pp. 57-200. Read both the text and the annotations very closely. Focus your DQs on how the annotations alter your reading of the novel. We're going to learn how to close read Frankenstein by close reading the editors' annotations, looking at what they do and do not annotate.

Recommended Listening:

TLS Voices
A Monster Success "2016 was the 200th anniversary of a dark and stormy night with an extraordinary literary legacy: Frankenstein. Frances Wilson and Benjamin Markovits recount the three days in June, 1816, at the Villa Diodati near Lake Geneva, when a group of young writers – among them Mary Godwin – sheltered from the gloom."

January 12:

Required Reading:

Assignment due January 11: Table of Contents of Your Annotations to the Annotated Frankenstein

January 17

Required Reading:

Susan J. Wolfson and Ronald Levao, Ed. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Annotated Frankenstein, pp. 1-56; pp. 201-300. Read both the text and the annotations very closely as you did before. This time, pay atttention to how the introduction sets up annotations that repeat points already made in the introduction.

January 9:

Required Reading:

Susan J. Wolfson and Ronald Levao, Ed. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Annotated Frankenstein, 301-89. Again, focus your DQs on the annotations. This time read them closely in order find your way into a close reading of the novel.

January 24: Co-Leaders: Theo theo9002@ufl.edu and Sirene daghersirene@ufl.edu

Required Reading:

Mary Shelley, The Original Frankenstein (Vintage Classics)
Charles E. Robinson (Editor), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Collaborator). Read the Appendices first, pp. 430-43; then read Mary Shelley's draft of Frankenstein, pp. 254-359

Recommended Reading:

Cora Kaplan, "Wild Nights: Pleasure/ Sexuality/ Feminism," in Sea Changes: Essays on Culture and Feminism

Do You Know Them?

Randall McCloud, "Un-editing Shakespeare"

Random Cloud, "Fearful Asymmetry"

January 26: Co-Leaders: Lizette lesquivel@ufl.edu and Matthew matthewjohnbrown@ufl.edu

Required Reading:

Mary Shelley, The Original Frankenstein (Vintage Classics)
Charles E. Robinson (Editor), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Collaborator). Aknowledgements, pp. 6-9; Introduction, 16-35; Note on the Text, 40-41; Mary Shelley's draft, pp. 359-429.

Write one of your your DQs on the Acknowledgements, Introduction, and the Note on the Text.

Write one of your DQs on a page from the draft and the page for the 1818 Frankenstein you are invited to compare to it at the bottom of the page you are reading of the draft, aka the Original Frankenstein.

Recommended Reading:

Recommended Reading: Digital Facsimiles and Modern Criticism

Stephen Hebron and Elizabeth C. Denlinger, Shelley's Ghost: Reshaping the Image of a Literary Family


CLICK HERE FOR First Paper (500 words) DUE Saturday JANUARY 28 by 11:59 p.m.

January 31: Co-Leaders: Juan juancho7111@ufl.edu and Amber aflaskey@ufl.edu

Required Reading:

Robert Falcon Scott, Captain Scott's Last Expedition (Oxford World's Classics) or read this online facsimile. Page numbers refer to the Oxford print edition.

Editor's Appendix II: The Finding of the Dead by E. L. Atkinson, 453-56; Composition and Publication History, xlii-xlviii; Chapters I, VI, XI, and XIII; pp. 9-27; 128-42; 194-209; 261-81.

Recommended Viewing and Reading:

Captain Scott’s Lost Photographs (2011)

Alfred, Lord Tennyson, "Ulysses"1842

Scott's Gramophone

harp seals

Captain Scott: The Voyage of the Discovery

Jules Verne, Journey to the Center Earth

Captain Scott's doomed polar expedition remembered at St Paul's

The Snow Tomb of Captain Robert Falcon Scott

South Pole Expeditions Then and Now: How Does Their Food and Gear Compare?

Scott of the Antarctic: 100 years on

February 2: Co-Leaders: Nathalie natalietleon@ufl.edu and Lindsey lindsron@ufl.edu

bschwinghammer@ufl.edu

Required Reading:

Robert Falcon Scott, Captain Scott's Last Expedition (Oxford World's Classics), Chapters XVIII to the end, pp. 356-98

Required Viewing:

The Great White Silence [BFI Restoration and Reconstruction of 1924 film elements]

Recommended Viewing and Reading:

90 Degrees South (dir. Herbert Ponting, 1924)

'To the South Pole, Captain Scott's Own Story, Told From His Journals', Part I, Strand Magazine, July 1913, To the South Pole, etc.', Part II, Strand August 1913.

February 7: Co-Leaders: Alexa ahernandez94@ufl.edu and Pearl pearl1994@ufl.edu

Required Reading:

Apsley Cherry-Garrard, The Worst Journey In The World (Vintage Classics), pp. 461-564, Chapters 16-19. Or Penguin Classics edition (LOL).

Facsimile online:

Cherry-Garrard, Apsley, The Worst Journey in the World (1922)

Recommended:

The Worst Journey in the World (BBC 4 Doc. Mark Gatiss, dir. 2007)

Franklin Expedition Mummies (Walton's failed quest to find the Norhtwest Passage and the creature as a mummy in Frankenstein)

"Hear Ernest Shackleton Speak About His Antarctic Expedition in a Rare 1909 Recording
in History
"

Feburary 9 Co-Leaders: Erin ecinney@ufl.edu and Raliegh rvbevill@ufl.edu

Required Viewing: The Epic of Everest (dir. Captain John Noel, 1924)

The film is online here.

Recommended Viewing:

S.O.S. Eisberg (S.O.S. Iceberg) (dir. Arnold Fanck, 1933)

Everest Official Trailer #1 (2015)

Encounters at the End of the World (dir. Werner Herzog, 2007)

Letter Never Sent (dir. Mikhail Kalatozov, 1959)

Charles Darwin, James T. Costa, The Annotated Origin: A Facsimile of the First Edition of On the Origin of the Species

Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man: The Concise Edition

Charles Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle: Charles Darwin's Journal of Researches (Penguin Classics)

March of the Penguins (2005)

Expédition Antarctica : sur les traces du manchot empereur (2017)

The Intro to Contact (dir. Robert Zemeckis,1997)

The Frozen Dead (dir. Herbert J. Leder, 1966)

February 14 Frank frankmedina716@ufl.edu and Broderick bschwinghammer@ufl.edu

Required Reading:

Gérard Genette, Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation

PDF is here.

Table of Contents pdf of Introduction Here.

February 16: Co-Leaders: Claudia clouders1996@ufl.edu and Pearl pearl1994@ufl.edu                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

Required Reading:

Gérard Genette, "Conclusion" to Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation

PDF is here.

February 21: Co-Leaders: Erin ecinney@ufl.edu and Sophia sp101girl@ufl.edu

Focus your DQs on the way Nabokov creates a fctional critical edition of a fictional manuscripts the edito will not publish; with a made up line-by-line critical commentary as well as an index by a fictional academic editor.

Required Reading:

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire, pp. 11-190

February 23: Co-Leaders: Frank frankmedina716@ufl.edu  and  Sirene daghersirene@ufl.edu

Required Reading:

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire, 190-315.

Recommended Readings:

Pale Fire: A Poem in Four Cantos by John Shade 2011

Dmitri Nabokov, Original of Laura

Yuri Leving, ed. Shades of Laura: Vladimir Nabokov's Last Novel, The Original of Laura Oct 28, 2013

February 28: Co-Leaders: Robyn sutterr14@ufl.edu and Aaron agruman@ufl.edu   

Required Reading:

Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (Oxford World's Classics), 279-329 and Introduction pp. xxix-xxxix

March 2: Co-Leaders Joshwa joshwawalton@ufl.edu and ?

Required Reading:

Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (Oxford World's Classics), pp. 330-361

March 7: Spring Break

March 9: Spring Break

March 14: Sequel as Palimpsest

Co-Leaders: Joshwa joshwawalton@ufl.edu and Greg longbgre@ufl.edu

1. Gérard Genette, Palimpsests Table of Contents; pp. 1-7; 24-30; 162-64; 192-95; 206-09.Write one of your DQs comparing the toc of Paratexts to the toc of Palimpsests.

2. Edgar Allan Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, and Related Tales (Oxford World's Classics) Preface and Chapters 1-14, pp. 1-107

March 16: Co-Leaders Amantha amanthakelly@ufl.edu  and Jessica jessicatorr2@ufl.edu

Edgar Allan Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, and Related Tales (Oxford World's Classics) Preface and Chapters 14 to the end, pp. 108-78; Introduction, vii-xx.

March 21: We will decide in class which of two novels to read for March 21and 23 listed below.

Co-Leaders Kayln kdrexl25@ufl.edu and Lindsey lindsron@ufl.edu        

 Required Reading (print or online):

1. Gérard Genette, Palimpsests pp. 381-400.

2. Either

H. P. Lovecraft, At the Mountains of Madness online and in one of editions below, H. P. Lovecraft, The Classic Horror Stories (Oxford World's Classics) Roger Luckhurst (Editor) or The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (Penguin).

OR

2. Jules Verne, The Sphinx of the Ice Realm or An Antarctic Mystery

March 23: Co-Leaders Dana d.lake@ufl.edu and Sophia sp101girl@ufl.edu

H. P. Lovecraft, At the Mountains of Madness online and in one of editions below, H. P. Lovecraft, The Classic Horror Stories (Oxford World's Classics) Roger Luckhurst (Editor) or The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (Penguin).                                                                                                                                 

Recommended Reading:

H. P. Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulu

Jules Verne, The Adventures of Captain Hatteras

Mat Johnson, Pym: A Novel

March 28: Framed Narratives, Again

Co-Leaders: Claudia clouders1996@ufl.edu and Brooke  brookewoo10@ufl.edu                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Required Reading:

1. Gérard Genette, Palimpsests, pp. 303-62.

2. Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness and Other Tales (Oxford World's Classics), pp.103-87.

March 30: Co-Leaders Alexa ahernandez94@ufl.edu and Amber aflaskey@ufl.edu

Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness and Other Tales (Oxford World's Classics)

Recommended Readings:

Nidesh Lawtoo, ed. Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness' and Contemporary Thought: Revisiting the Horror with Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe

Reich, James Mistah Kurtz! A Prelude to Heart of Darkness

Gérard Genette, Palimpsests pp. 381-400.

Second Paper (500 words) DUE Saturday March 25 by 11:59 p.m.

April 4 Co-Leaders: Dana d.lake@ufl.edu and Kalyn kdrexl25@ufl.edu

Required Reading: Note on the Text, pp. ix-x; "Introduction," 1-24; "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar," 337-49; "The Gold Bug," 266-305.

Edgar Allan Poe (Author), Kevin J. Hayes (Editor), William Giraldi (Foreword) The Annotated Poe  2015

April 6: Co-Leaders: Greg longbgre@ufl.edu and Aaron agruman@ufl.ed

Required Reading: "The Purloined Letter," 318-36; "The Raven," 374-82; Appendix: First Printings, Reprints, and Translations Published During Poe's Lifetime, 397-402.

April 11: Death Leaves Unfinished Novel Co-Leaders: ? and ?

Required Reading:

Charles Dickens, Mystery of Edwin Drood (Oxford World's Classics), Chapters I-XIII, pp. 1-120.

If you have very good eyes and do not mind reading very small type, the Oxford will do fine. However, if you prefer a larger type, the Everyman Library is good (kindle and hardcover). The Penguin is also good (paperback).

Recommended Reading:

Jacques Derrida Beast and the Sovereign Vol. 1

April 13: Co-Leaders Brooke brookewoo10@ufl.edu and Meghan meghanleedavis.1@ufl.edu                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

Required Reading:

Charles Dickens, Mystery of Edwin Drood (Oxford World's Classics) Chapters XIV to the end; 121-217.

Recommended Reading:

April 18: It's Over: The Editor as Posthumous Publisher: Co-Leaders ? and ?

Required Reading:

Washington Irving and Susan Manning, “Rip van Winkle (A Posthumous Writing of Diedrich Knickerbocker)" in The Sketch-Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent (Oxford World's Classics) 

Or IS IT?!!

Recommended Reading:

Knickerbocker, Diedrich. History of New York.

Uwe Wirth, Die Geburt des Autors auf dem Geist der Herausgegerfiiktion Editoriale Rahnmung in Roman um 1800: Wieland, Goethe, Brentano, Jean Paul, and E. T. A. Hoffmann (2008)


Genette's comments on Pale Fire in Paratexts:
"Dwelling on it here would be unwise, for one is always oneself a little more Dragonfly than one might wish, so instead I briefly call to mind the presence amid the throng of another caricature, one no less sarcastic but certainly considerably more accomplished as a literary achieve- ment: the commentary in notes to John Shade's poem provided by Shade's nuisance of a colleague and neighbor, Charles Kinbote, in Pale Fire. This commentary, as we know, furnishes the essence of what indeed ends up constituting a kind of novel, despite Kinbote's disavowals. "I have no desire," he says, "to twist and batter an unambiguous apparatus criticus into the monstrous semblance of a novel." In reality, of course, what we have is a novel in the form of a monstrous semblance, or cruel caricature, of an apparatus criticus. Having failed to get John Shade to use his (Kinbote's) history, real or mythical, as the subject of Shade's poem and having acquired the manuscript after Shade's death, Kinbote tries, half-veraciously and half- mendaciously, to force upon the poem a commentary that relates as many details as possible to himself, his native land, his fate - so much so as to ultimately make Pale Fire a kind of indirect, allusive, or cryptic narrative of his experiences. A perfect example of textual appropriation, this apparatus is also an exemplary staging of the abusiveness and paranoia always found in any interpretive commentary, supported by the unlimited submis siveness of any text to any hermeneutic, however unscrupulous the latter may be. I am not sure but what some truths, since then, may have been stranger than that fiction."

pp. 341-42.
https://kimdhillon.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/genette_gerard_paratexts_thresholds_of_interpretation.pdf